Showing posts with label Custom Control Sensors. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Custom Control Sensors. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

CCS DualSnap Pressure and Temperature Controls


CCS manufactures pressure and temperatures switches used in many industrial and aerospace applications. CCS’ designs utilize proven, rugged “Dual-Snap®” disc spring and advanced sensing technologies to provide customers superior solutions for pressure and temperature applications.

Contact Mountain States Engineering & Controls for more information.
303-232-4100

Monday, October 12, 2015

Easy Pressure Switch Installation for Hazardous Areas

Adjustable Setpoint Pressure
Pressure Switch for Hazardous
Areas
Courtesy Custom Control Sensors
Industrial process control applications present an unending stream of challenges to designers, engineers, technicians, and other stakeholders. Because of the general nature and scale of industrial operations, there is often danger and risk involved during normal operation, as well as the potential for catastrophic impact to personnel, environment, and other assets in the the case of failure. The equipment and components we employ in our processes have three areas of consideration. Firstly, they must perform some range of functions reliably under normal operating conditions. Second, the contribution of any device to the risk of process failure must be minimized. Thirdly, there may be performance requirements for the device under abnormal process or environmental conditions.

Hazardous areas, with potentially explosive atmospheres due to the presence of certain gases or fine particulates, pose a particularly challenging set of circumstances to those of us striving to make things work properly. Everything within the hazardous area must be hardened in such a way that it poses no risk of being the source of ignition of the surrounding atmosphere. There are various effective methods for accomplishing this, most of which involve substantially increased cost and time.

Custom Control Sensors, a manufacturer that devotes a substantial portion of its product line to control devices for use in hazardous areas, has added a new development to their series of adjustable setpoint industrial pressure switches. The latest addition to the line is suitable for hazardous areas and has a unique feature that will save time, money, and a even a little space in your process area.

The newest version of the company's 6900 series industrial pressure switch features a Turck® connector that simplifies installation in Class I, Division 2 applications. Use of the connector eliminates the need for an electrical junction box at the sensor location and makes installation or removal of the device a simple operation. This improvement simplifies the deployment of pressure switches in hazardous areas.

The features and specifications for the product are included in the data sheet that I have shared below. The manufacturer sees applications for the product in:

  • Wellhead control panels
  • Chemical injection skids
  • Hydraulic control packages
  • Gas compression skids
  • Off-shore and on-shore installations
You may have your own potentially advantageous applications for this or some other CCS products. Contact a product specialist to explore product solutions to your process challenges.





Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Pressure Switches for Industrial Applications

pressure switch
Industrial
Pressure
Switch
(CCS Dualsnap)

A pressure switch is a device that detects the presence of fluid pressure. Pressure switches use a variety of sensing elements such as diaphragms, bellows, bourdon tubes, or pistons. The movement of these sensors, caused by pressure fluctuation, is transferred to a set of electrical contacts to open or close a circuit.
Pressure Switch Symbols

Normal status of a switch is the resting state with stimulation. A pressure switch will be in its “normal” status when it senses low or minimum pressure. For a pressure switch, “normal” status is any fluid pressure below the trip threshold of the switch.

One of the earliest and most common designs of pressure switch was the bourdon tube pressure sensor with mercury switch. When pressure is applied, the bourdon tube flex's enough to tilt the glass bulb of the mercury switch so that the mercury flows over the electrical contacts, thus completing the circuit. the glass bulb tilts far enough to cause the mercury to fall against a pair of electrodes, thus completing an electrical circuit. Many of these pressure switches were sold on steam boilers. While they became a de facto standard, they were sensitive to vibration and breakage of the mercury bulb.

Pressure switches using micro type electrical switches and force-balanced pressure sensors is another common design.  The force provided by the pressure-sensing element against a mechanical spring is balanced until one overcomes the other. The tension on the spring may be adjusted to set the tripping point, thus providing an adjustable setpoint.

One of the criteria of any pressure switch is the deadband or (reset pressure differential). This setting determines the amount of pressure change required to re-set the switch to its normal state after it has tripped.  The “differential” pressure of a pressure switch should not to be confused with differential pressure switch, which actually measures the difference in pressure between two separate pressure ports.

When selecting pressure switches you must consider the electrical requirements (volts, amps, AC or DC), the area classification (hazardous, non-hazardous, general purpose, water-tight), pressure sensing range, body materials that will be exposed to ambient contaminants, and wetted materials (parts that are exposed to the process media).

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Non-Hazardous Industrial Pressure and Temperature Switches

A quick reference to Custom Control Sensors (CCS) DualSnap non-hazardous pressure and temperature switches for industrial process control application.

Used in petrochemical, chemical, water treatment, pulp & paper, military, aerospace, commercial food processing, power generation, pipelines, bulk storage facilities and mining.