Showing posts with label Warren Controls. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Warren Controls. Show all posts

Thursday, March 2, 2017

New Electric Linear Actuators for Industrial Valves

electric linear valve actuators
Electric linear actuators for industrial valves
ILEA Series
Courtesy Warren Controls
There are uncountable choices for industrial process control valves and actuators. With applications so diverse and requirements so specific, each product seems to enjoy a placement within a particular niche or range of usage where it provides the perfect combination of construction, performance, and cost attributes.

Warren Controls, manufacturer of a wide range of industrial control valves and actuators that include both linear and rotary designs, has released an electrically powered linear actuator that provides some application advantages.

The ILEA series of industrial linear electric actuators provides failsafe features, fast operation, robust environmental performance, and extended output force ranges. This all is delivered at a cost point making the ILEA series a contender for any modulating valve service application.

The datasheet included below provides additional detail. Share your fluid process control valve challenges with valve application experts, combining your own process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.


Friday, June 19, 2015

Industrial Control Valve Basics - An Introduction

Industrial process control valve
Globe Valve with Pneumatic Actuator
Courtesy Warren Controls
Valves, mechanical devices able to control flow or pressure in a process or system, are as ubiquitous as any industrial process control element. As essential components of piping systems conveying liquid, gas, vapor, or slurry, valves are a component with which almost every industrial process and control engineer will require more than entry level familiarity. They are the controlling element in almost any fluid handling system. What are some of the very basic knowledge points for specifying and selecting a control valve?

There are numerous types of valves available, including butterfly, ball, check, globe, gate, diaphragm, plug, and control valves as the most common. Particular valve types can be better suited to the medium being controlled, or have functional capabilities making them a better selection for your process application. Within each type there will be a wide range of options and features that allow for close tailoring of the complete valve assembly to match the application requirements.  Some valves can be self-operated, while others require manual operation. A pneumatic, hydraulic, or electric actuator can be employed on certain configurations to provide for remote control of the valve by a human operator or automatic controller.
General valve functions include:
  • Flow start or stop
  • Flow rate increase or reduction
  • Diversion of flow in another direction
  • Regulation of a flow or process pressure

Industrial process control valves are often classified according to their mechanical movement. Some common examples include:
  • Linear motion valves, in which the closure element moves in a straight (linear) direction to control the flow. Gate, globe, and diaphragm valves are in this category.
  • Rotary motion valves have a closure that follows an angular or circular path. Butterfly and ball valves are in this group.
  • Quarter turn valves, a subset of the rotary motion class, traverse from the open to closed state when the closure element (for example, the ball in a ball valve) is rotated through a quarter of a full turn. This type is best suited for operations calling for either fully open or closed regulation, with no need for control at points in between those two states.

Each industrial control valve application and installation will have its own set of very specific requirements. The goal of the specification and selection process should be to provide safe operation, low maintenance requirements, robust and accurate operation. A manufacturer's sales engineer can be a useful source for application and specification information and assistance.
Oil Pipeline Valve
Ball Valve Installed in Pipeline
Courtesy DHV

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Control Valve Application Checklist

Specifying of applying an industrial control valve? Here is a comprehensive checklist to help:

PROCESS CONSIDERATIONS:
Warren Control Valve
Control Valve
  1. What is the medium to be controlled. Is it a liquid, gas, or slurry?
  2. Is it corrosive, abrasive, explosive or clean single-phase medium?
  3. What is the upstream or inlet pressure. Don’t guess – use a gauge.
  4. What is the downstream pressure when valve is closed, and when flowing?
  5. Are the Vapor pressure, viscosity or specific gravity and critical properties known?
  6. What are the inlet and outlet pipe size(s) [ May be different ] and schedule?
  7. Normal, Minimal, and Startup conditions for flow, pressures and temperatures?
  8. What impact will even a small seat leakage create when shut off?
  9. What Class is required?
  10. Is the installation in an occupied area. Noise or other hazardous considerations?
  11. What is the “fail safe” orientation? In place, closed or open?
  12. If in a fail safe orientation, is a manual readjustment to be expected?
  13. What is the ANSI Pressure Class of the pipe flanges and valves in the loop?
  14. What has been the operational history in an existing application?
  15. What material is the existing piping made of. Is it considered compatible?
  16. Is there an existing valve in place and a face-to-face dimension to match?
  17. Where will the valve be located – elevation – within a piping nightmare?
  18. What maintenance – routine or preventative is normal and expected?
  19. What are preferences for Control Valve Actuation – pneumatic or electric? WHY?
  20. Is the customer going to actuate it himself and buy a “bare stem” valve?
  21. Is the stem boss compatible with his actuator stem. Double “D” or square?
  22. Is the calculated flow velocity below limits of 100 – 125 fps for saturated steam?
  23. Is the calculated flow velocity below limits of 5 fps for liquids?
  24. Is the calculated flow velocity below limits of 250 – 400 fps for gases?
"REAL WORLD" APPLICATIONS CONSIDERATIONS:
  1. Could moving vehicles damage the valve, in a specific installed location.
  2. Might seismic forces or fires present a danger to workers.
  3. What codes may be in effect? Body pressure Code, Leakage Criteria
  4. Might workers use the valve as a stepladder when conditions dictate?
  5. Is the application a “continuously modulating” or an on / off practice?
  6. Might the process be shutdown for nights or weekends?
  7. What might result when started back up after an extended shutdown?
  8. Use your imagination, anticipate the worst, and ask more questions – more, in this case, is always better.
  9. What range air set is available for actuator or positioner?
  10. Could it allow a higher than safe pressure?
  11. Where will the user store documentation for IO&M purposes?
  12. Is routine maintenance allowed or is an annual shutdown more typical?
  13. Could moving vehicles damage the valve, in a specific installed location?
  14. Might seismic forces or fires present a danger to workers?
  15. What codes may be in effect? Body pressure Code, Leakage Criteria?
  16. Might workers use the valve as a stepladder when conditions dictate?
  17. Is the application a “continuously modulating” or an on / off practice?
  18. Might the process be shutdown for nights or weekends?
  19. What might result when started back up after an extended shutdown?
  20. Use your imagination, anticipate the worst, and ask more questions – more, in this case, is always better.
  21. What range air set is available for actuator or positioner?
  22. Could it allow a higher than safe pressure?
  23. Where will the user store documentation for IO&M purposes?
  24. Is routine maintenance allowed or is an annual shutdown more typical?
PHYSICAL AND CONFIGURATION CONSIDERATIONS:
  1. Flowing media to be controlled. Steam, Liquid or Gas?
  2. Pressures upstream and downstream, therefore the differential.
  3. Two way – modulating, or on/off. Three way diverting or mixing?
  4. Is the material abrasive, explosive, or clean?
  5. Hot or Cold water chemically treated?
  6. What are inlet and outlet pipe sizes and schedules?
  7. Maximum, Normal and Startup conditions?
  8. Leakage allowed?
  9. Valve in occupied area?
  10. Previous usage history?
  11. Pipe material of construction?
  12. Actuation Pneumatic or Electric
  13. Maintenance allowed or anticipated?
  14. IO&M storage and accessibility?
  15. Control signal – PID compatibility?
  16. Mounting restrictions?
  17. How was valve “sized?”
Checklist courtesy of Warren Controls

Please consult with a application expert before selecting or installing a control valve.

Friday, June 6, 2014

A Specialty Electric Actuator for Linear Valves with Precise Control and Failsafe

Warren Controls’ compact AMURACT electrically operates 1/2” through 4”control valves quickly, reliably, accurately and with shutoff capability rivaling pneumatics. Works with multiple supply voltages and signals. Electronic fail-safe needs no operating force to maintain lockup against elevated water or steam pressures. Stainless steel construction is maintenance-free. Purchase price is competitive and operating costs are extremely low. Here's a demo: