Showing posts with label ball valve. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ball valve. Show all posts

Thursday, January 25, 2018

Krombach Brand Valves for Rugged Service Conditions

metal seated butterfly valve with actuator
Metal seated butterfly valves for aggressive process
applications are a hallmark of the Krombach brand.
Image courtesy Crane CPE
The Krombach branded valves, part of the Crane CPE product offering, target challenging applications in industrial settings that benefit from the use of valves specially designed for severe service. The brand also includes a standard product offering of valves and specialties for a broad range of common industrial applications.

The Krombach line includes:

  • Butterfly Valves - High performance, resilient seated, double-eccentric, triple offset and special purpose butterfly valves.
  • Ball Valves - Process one-piece, two-piece and three-piece, metal seated, soft seated and compact ball valves.
  • Globe and Angle Valves - Bronze, cast iron, cast steel and stainless steel globe and angle valves.
  • Gate Valves - Bronze, cast iron, cast steel and stainless steel gate valves.
  • Check Valves - Ball, dual-plate, foot, full body swing, steam stop, tilting disc, wafer style swing, nozzle-type and pressure seal check valves.
  • Vacuum Relief Valves - Available with flanged or threaded connections.
  • Aerating and Deaerating Valves - Essential for trouble-free operation of pipeline systems handling liquids.
  • Float Valves - Single seated and double seated versions for a variety of applications.
  • Throttle Valves - Available with flange connection, wafer- or weld-in type.
  • Bottom Drain Valves - Available manually operated or with a diaphragm actuator.

Below is a cutsheet providing an overview of the company's standard product categories. Whatever your fluid control application, share your challenges with the valve specialists at MSEC. Leverage your own process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop effective valve and automation solutions.


Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Ball Sector Valves

industrial ball valves with actuators
Industrial ball sector valves with a variety of actuators
Image courtesy of Schubert & Salzer
The manufacturers of valves and other fluid control components for the processing industries have never been shy about tweaking designs to deliver better performance for a particular set of operating conditions. The available basic valve designs, along with their variants, create an immense catalog of potential candidates for each application.

One such design variant is the ball sector valve. It is a quarter turn valve, like its cousin the ball valve, but the trim is different. True to its name, the active closure structure is but a portion of what we know of as a common ball valve. Where a ball valve essentially has a sphere with a hole drilled through it, a ball sector valve more resembles a section of a hollowed out sphere with a shaped opening in the surface.

ball sector valve animation
Ball sector valve is a quarter
turn valve.
Image courtesy Schubert & Salzer
The closure in a ball valve can be floating or trunnion mounted. A ball sector valve will have a trunnion style mounted closure, with rigid support at the top and bottom. Ball valves, with their rotating fluid pathway resembling a short tube, are generally not the best option for flow control other than isolation. The ball sector valve functions similar to a sliding gate valve, providing an increasing or decreasing elliptical shaped opening as the shaft is turned.

Ball sector valves are well suited for applications involving isolation or control of viscous fluids, slurries, and other challenging fluids. Because of the construction and centric trunnion mounting, the seal area on the ball sector valve is kept free of the media, leading to reduced wear and superior longevity.

There are some good cutaway illustrations in the brochure included below that detail the valve construction. Share your fluid control challenges of all types with valve specialists, leveraging your own process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.




Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Trunnion vs. Floating Ball Valves

trunnion mount ball valve for industrial pipeline use
Trunnion mount ball valves have upper and lower support
points for the ball.
Image courtesy International Standard Valve, Inc.
The design, construction, and function of a ball valve is generally well understood in the industrial fluid processing arena. Ball valves provide reliable quarter turn operation, compact form factor, and tight shutoff capability, making the ball valve a preferred choice for many applications. Some ball valves also provide shutoff of fluid flow in either direction. A primary valve trim design feature permits grouping of the many variants of industrial ball valves into two categories, distinguished solely by the way in which the ball is mounted in the body.

Floating ball valves use the seats and body to hold the ball in place within the fluid flow path, with the force of directional flow pushing the ball against the downstream seats to produce a tight shutoff seal. Many floating ball valves are capable of flow shutoff in either direction. The ball is rotated by a shaft connected at the top which extends through the pressure enclosure of the valve for connection to a handle or automated actuator. The floating nature of the ball limits the applicability of this design to smaller valve sizes and lower pressures. A some point, the fluid pressure exerted on the ball surface can exceed the ability of the seats to hold the ball effectively in place.

Trunnion mount ball valves employ the stem shaft and, you guessed it, a trunnion to rigidly position the ball within the body. The shaft and trunnion, connected to the top and bottom of the ball, establish a vertical axis of rotation for the ball and prevent it from shifting in response to flow pressure. The trunnion is a pin that protrudes from the bottom side of the ball. It sits within a bearing shape, generally cylindrical, in the base of the body.

Because of their structural design, trunnion mount ball valves are suitable for all pressure ranges and sizes.They are used by many manufacturers as a basis of design for their severe service ball valve offerings. A trunnion mount ball valve can also be advantageous for applications employing valve automation. Since the ball is not held in place by a tight fitting seal arrangement, operating torque tends to be lower for comparably sized trunnion mount valves, when compared to floating ball valves.

On page 3 of the brochure included below, the exploded view of a trunnion ball valve shows the location of the trunnion assembly.

Whatever your valve application challenge, share it with an industrial valve expert. Leverage your own process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.


Monday, May 22, 2017

Introduction to Valve Parts or Components

cutaway view forged steel gate valve
Cutaway view of a forged steel gate valve
Courtesy Crane-ChemPharmaEnergy
Although there are many different classifications of valves specific to their respective functions, there are standard parts or components of valves you may find regardless of the classification. They are the valve body, bonnet, trim, seat, stem, actuator, and packing.

The Valve Body is the primary boundary of a pressure valve which serves as the framework for the entire valve’s assembly. The body resists fluid pressure loads from connected inlet and outlet piping; the piping is connected through threaded, bolted, or welded joints.

The Valve Bonnet is the opening of the Valve Body’s cover. Bonnets can vary in design and model, is built using the same material as the Valve Body, and is also connected to the entire assembly through threaded, bolted, or welded joints.

The Valve Trim collectively refers to all the replaceable parts in a valve, e.g. the disk, seat, stem, and sleeves––all which guide the stem as well.

The Valve Disk allows the passage or stoppage of flow. Disks provide reliable wear properties and differ in what they look like per valve type. For example, in the case of a ball valve, the disk is called a ball, whereas for a plug valve it is a plug.

The Valve Seat(s) or it’s seal rings provide surface seating for the disk. For example, a globe valve requires only one seat and this seat forms a seal with the disk to stop flow.

The Valve Stem provides the proper position which will allow the opening and closing movement of the Valve Disk. Therefore, it is connected to the Valve Disk on one end and the Valve Hand Wheel or the Valve Actuator on the other.

The Valve Yoke is the final piece in the valve’s assembly; the Yoke connects the Valve Bonnet with the actuating mechanism. The Valve Stem passes through the top of the Yoke which holds the Yoke or stem nut.

There are countless variants of valve designs, sizes, and configurations. These basic parts will be found on most, but the particular form and arrangement of the part may provide an advantage when employed for a particular application. Share your industrial process valve requirements and challenges with a valve specialist. Combine your own process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Metal Seated Ball Valves Offer Potential for Long Term Cost Savings

3 piece ball valve with handle
Adding metal seats to a ball valve can extend its service life
Photo courtesy of Flo Tite
The majority of ball valves are provided with one of several elastomeric materials forming a soft seat between the trim, or ball, and the valve body. With the balance of the valve assembly in contact with the media likely to be metal (unless, of  course, it is a plastic valve), the soft seat, because of its properties and location, tends to experience wear and tear and be a common cause for repair or valve performance deterioration.

In fluid process control applications where the media conditions may not, at first glance, warrant the use of a metal seated valve, there may be long term returns to be gained from the added cost of metal seats. The factors that create wear and degradation of soft seats are generally better tolerated by metal seats. Process downtime or man-hours for repair have a cost, so avoiding or reducing the occurrences of repair or maintenance provide a return on the additional expenditure for a metal seated valve that can provide a longer service life.

Many commonly available ball valves are also available with metal seats as an option, or metal seated variants are offered as uniquely identified products. Whatever the case, consider hardening your valve selections with metal seated valves. There are instances where they are well suited to the application and will offer a return on the additional cost.

Share your fluid process control challenges with a valve specialist, combining your own process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.



Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Trunnion Mount Ball Valves

stainless steel trunnion mount ball valve flange connections
One example of many variants for
trunnion mount ball valves
Courtesy HS Valve
A ball valve is generally a well understood industrial valve design. Its simple quarter turn operation, bidirectional sealing, compact form factor, and tight shutoff capability make the ball valve a preferred choice for many applications. The many variants of industrial ball valves can be grouped into two categories, distinguished by a primary design feature, the mounting of the ball.

The two designs are known as floating ball and trunnion mounted ball. Floating ball valves use the seats and body to hold the ball in place within the fluid flow path, with the force of directional flow pushing the ball against the downstream seats. The floating nature of the ball limits the applicability of this design to smaller valve sizes and pressure ranges. A some point, the fluid pressure exerted on the ball surface can exceed the ability of the seats to hold the trim effectively in place.

Trunnion mount ball valves employ the stem shaft and, you guessed it, a trunnion to support the trim. The shaft and trunnion, connected to the top and bottom of the trim, establish a vertical axis of rotation for the ball and prevent it from shifting in response to flow pressure. A trunnion is a pin that protrudes from the bottom side of the ball. It sits within a bearing shape, generally cylindrical, in the base of the body.

Because of their structural design, trunnion mount ball valves are suitable for all pressure ranges and sizes.They are used by many manufacturers as a basis of design for their severe service ball valve offerings. A trunnion mount ball valve can also be advantageous for applications employing valve automation. Since the ball is not held in place by a tight fitting seal arrangement, operating torque tends to be lower for comparably sized trunnion mount valves, when compared to floating ball valves.

Whatever your valve application challenge, share it with an industrial valve expert. The combining of your process expertise and experience with their product application knowledge will yield an effective solution.


Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Floating Ball Valves

exploded view of floating ball valve
Exploded view of floating ball valve
Courtesy HS Valve
Ball valves are used throughout fluid based applications, from residential to heavy industrial. The compact and rugged design of this valve type provides superior service when properly applied. There are many variants of the basic design, with manufacturers providing builds that meet very specific and stringent requirements posed by certain types of industrial process control applications.

Ball valves are named for the spherically shaped element encased in the valve body directly in the fluid flow path. The ball has a hole, or port, through it’s center, permitting fluid to pass when the port is aligned with the direction of flow. A stem is attached to the ball and extends to the exterior of the valve body, providing a mechanical means of rotating the ball between open and closed positions. Ninety degrees of rotation moves the ball from the fully open to fully closed position. Ball valves are generally suitable for manual or automated operation.

In the basic design of ball valves, there are two groups which exhibit an essential structural difference that is worth mentioning. There are two ways in which the ball in a ball valve is held in place. A floating ball valve has its main trim element held in place by the shape of the valve body and the seats. It is essentially suspended in the flow path by its surrounding parts. A very small amount of lateral movement of the ball is imparted by the fluid flow, pushing the ball tightly against the seat on the downstream side. This attribute enables a floating ball valve to provide tight shutoff of bidirectional flow. The floating ball design proves less effective as the nominal bore size increases. The added weight of the larger ball, coupled with the larger surface area exposed to fluid forces, can overcome the ability of the seals to properly support the ball and maintain good performance. The maximum size can vary among manufacturers.

Enjoying all the benefits of ball valve design, plus being comparatively simple to disassemble and service, floating ball valves are a solid choice for many industrial applications. Selecting the right valve design or type is an important step toward effective control of fluid operations. Share your fluid process control challenges with a valve expert, combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.



Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Applications For Metal Seated Ball Valve

metal seated ball valve with handle and flange connections
Metal Seated Ball Valve
Crane - Krombach
Fluid process control employs valves of various types to start, stop, throttle, or divert flow of a fluid. Ball valves are a common selection for process application when their inherent advantages provide the greatest benefit.
  • Leak-proof service
  • Well suited for processes requiring only full flow or no flow operation.
  • Rapid open and close action, requiring only 90 degrees of rotation from fully open to fully closed.
  • Comparatively light weight and compact size.
  • Wide range of construction material options for body, ball, and seals make them suitable for many applications.
  • Require only moderate force to control valve position.
  • Flow path opening in the ball will often be “full port”, providing same cross section as the connected pipe and adding very little restriction or pressure drop to the flow.
  • Low maintenance, with no lubrication required.
There are numerous ball valve variants that provide modified features and performance, but let's focus on what is generally considered severe service applications.

Severe service, while not currently defined by an international standard, generally can be characterized by one or more operating conditions that put great levels of stress or wear on valves.
  • Very extreme media or environmental temperature
  • High pressure drop operation that may cause cavitation
  • Rapid and extreme changes to inlet pressure
  • Certain types or amounts of solids contained in the fluid
  • Corrosive media
Some of these conditions will greatly impact the valve seat. Many valves are provided with thermoplastic seats that, while providing suitable performance throughout a wide range of media conditions, will deteriorate quickly under conditions prevailing in severe service. An alternative to the soft thermoplastic seats is a metal seat design. 
  • Greater temperature tolerance
  • Self cleaning seat
  • Improved resistance to effects of particulate laden media or slurries
  • Corrosion resistance, enhanced by special coatings applied to metal construction
The document below provides an in depth view of a metal seated ball valve. Operating conditions, specifications, and illustrations (including my favorite, the cutaway view) are provided. Share your fluid control requirements with product and application specialists, combining your process expertise with their product application knowledge to develop effective solutions.


Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Mountain States Engineering and Crane Expand Their Relationship

Triple Offset Butterfly Valve
Krombach Triple Offset Metal Seated Valve
Courtesy Crane CPE


Mountain States Engineering and Controls has been selected as the new distributor of the Krombach branded valves from Crane CPE. MSEC has been a master distributor for various brands in the Crane family for fifteen years, and will be capitalizing on knowledge and experience gained from their many years of providing solutions in the industrial process control and valve fields. The Krombach branded valves complement the applications range of other industrial valves handled by MSEC.

The Krombach line includes:
  • Butterfly Valves - High performance, resilient seated, double-eccentric, triple offset and special purpose butterfly valves.
  • Ball Valves - Process one-piece, two-piece and three-piece, metal seated, soft seated and compact ball valves.
  • Globe and Angle Valves - Bronze, cast iron, cast steel and stainless steel globe and angle valves.
  • Gate Valves - Bronze, cast iron, cast steel and stainless steel gate valves.
  • Check Valves - Ball, dual-plate, foot, full body swing, steam stop, tilting disc, wafer style swing, nozzle-type and pressure seal check valves.
  • Vacuum Relief Valves - Available with flanged or threaded connections.
  • Aerating and Deaerating Valves - Essential for trouble-free operation of pipeline systems handling liquids.
  • Float Valves - Single seated and double seated versions for a variety of applications.
  • Throttle Valves - Available with flange connection, wafer- or weld-in type.
  • Bottom Drain Valves - Available manually operated or with a diaphragm actuator.
I have included below one of the many comprehensive data sheets available. More information on any application or product is available from the process control specialists at MSEC. Combining their product knowledge with your process mastery is the key to positive outcomes.

Friday, June 26, 2015

Selecting The Right Valve Type - Ball Valves

Applications that can be characterized as industrial fluid handling or process control are vast in number and variety, each being highly specialized and customized to specific circumstances. It’s no surprise that, given the array of potential application conditions, there are countless different valve arrangements, types, and technologies to choose from.
Industrial Ball Valve
Large Industrial Ball Valve
Courtesy HS Valve Co.
Ball valves, like many valve types, are named for their closure mechanism. A spherical shaped element is placed in the fluid flow path, with the ability to rotate its position around an axis. The axis is a shaft or other device that connects to an actuator on the exterior of the valve and flow path. The actuator can be a simple handle or an element of a valve automation system. The “ball” in the ball valve has an opening through its center, usually round to mimic the shape of the connected pipe. As the ball is rotated, the opening aligns with the inlet an outlet of the valve body, allowing fluid to pass. A counter-rotation that aligns the opening with the sides of the valve body, away from the flow path, stops the fluid flow. So, compared with other valve technologies, when would a ball valve be a preferred application choice? Here are some points to consider.

Application advantages of ball valves:

  • Leak-proof service
  • Well suited for processes requiring only full flow or no flow operation.
  • Rapid open and close action, requiring only 90 degrees of rotation from fully open to fully closed.
  • Comparatively light weight and small size.
  • Wide range of construction material options for body, ball, and seals make them suitable for many applications.
  • Require only moderate force to control valve position.
  • Flow path opening in the ball will often be “full port”, providing same cross section as the connected pipe and adding very little restriction or pressure drop to the flow.
  • Low maintenance, with no lubrication required.

What considerations might be cause to consider a different valve type?

  • There can be some residual fluid trapped in the valve when it closes.The trapped fluid will be released when the valve is opened. Consider what impact, if any, this may have on your process.
  • Balls valves are generally not suited for throttling applications. When partially open, the seals that surround the ball are exposed to the flow velocity and can deteriorate quickly.
  • Valve seals are usually elastomeric materials. Verify seal materials are compatible with the fluid type, character and operating temperature.

These comments are general in nature and there are some specialized ball valve designs that have overcome some of the general disadvantages noted here. Have a conversation with a valve specialist about your application and benefit from their experience and knowledge.

Friday, June 19, 2015

Industrial Control Valve Basics - An Introduction

Industrial process control valve
Globe Valve with Pneumatic Actuator
Courtesy Warren Controls
Valves, mechanical devices able to control flow or pressure in a process or system, are as ubiquitous as any industrial process control element. As essential components of piping systems conveying liquid, gas, vapor, or slurry, valves are a component with which almost every industrial process and control engineer will require more than entry level familiarity. They are the controlling element in almost any fluid handling system. What are some of the very basic knowledge points for specifying and selecting a control valve?

There are numerous types of valves available, including butterfly, ball, check, globe, gate, diaphragm, plug, and control valves as the most common. Particular valve types can be better suited to the medium being controlled, or have functional capabilities making them a better selection for your process application. Within each type there will be a wide range of options and features that allow for close tailoring of the complete valve assembly to match the application requirements.  Some valves can be self-operated, while others require manual operation. A pneumatic, hydraulic, or electric actuator can be employed on certain configurations to provide for remote control of the valve by a human operator or automatic controller.
General valve functions include:
  • Flow start or stop
  • Flow rate increase or reduction
  • Diversion of flow in another direction
  • Regulation of a flow or process pressure

Industrial process control valves are often classified according to their mechanical movement. Some common examples include:
  • Linear motion valves, in which the closure element moves in a straight (linear) direction to control the flow. Gate, globe, and diaphragm valves are in this category.
  • Rotary motion valves have a closure that follows an angular or circular path. Butterfly and ball valves are in this group.
  • Quarter turn valves, a subset of the rotary motion class, traverse from the open to closed state when the closure element (for example, the ball in a ball valve) is rotated through a quarter of a full turn. This type is best suited for operations calling for either fully open or closed regulation, with no need for control at points in between those two states.

Each industrial control valve application and installation will have its own set of very specific requirements. The goal of the specification and selection process should be to provide safe operation, low maintenance requirements, robust and accurate operation. A manufacturer's sales engineer can be a useful source for application and specification information and assistance.
Oil Pipeline Valve
Ball Valve Installed in Pipeline
Courtesy DHV

Friday, May 29, 2015

Industrial Valve Body Style and Flow Path: A Visual Illustration

fluid dynamics image
(Image courtesy of Wikipedia)
There are many types of valves body styles, each with their own unique flow characteristic and pattern. Valve design generally dictates optimum application service for any given use. For instance, globe or diaphragm valves provide excellent flow control because of a very linear flow characteristic and are used widely as flow control valves. Conversely, standard ball or butterfly valves are not good control valves because of their very non-linear flow characteristic, and special modifications need to be made to their discs or balls to improve linearity.

The following video illustrates the design and flow pattern for (4) types of valve:

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Weld In-Place Ball Valves - A Unique Design Approach

Weld In-Place Ball Valve
Weld In-Place Ball Valve
Historically, weld-end ball valves presented challenges to users in process control applications because of the high temperatures during the weld, which would damage the temperature sensitive parts of the valve (seals and seats).

One work-around is to extend the piping to the valves ends, but this adds cost and time. Another solution is to dis-assemble the valves and remove the seals and seats prior to welding. Then, after welding, re-assembling the valve when the valve after everything has cooled down. This is much more complicated, takes more time and can be very problematic if the valve is part of an automated package.

A unique approach for socket weld and three piece valves, pioneered by valve manufacturer Flow-Tite, that uses integrated extended end-caps with heat sink rings. The design provides much more surface area, thus allowing the heat to dissipate during welding. Any heat conducted to the seat area does not have a high enough temperature to damage the valve seating or sealing material.

With this novel and common sense approach approach, soft-seated, three-piece ball valves that were once a problem to weld, can now be welded in-place without disassembly, extended time and related costs.