Showing posts with label cooling tower. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cooling tower. Show all posts

Friday, August 31, 2018

What is a Cooling Tower?

An evaporative cooling tower is heat removal device that uses ordinary water to transfer process waste heat from building and equipment into the atmosphere. All cooling towers operate on the principle of removing heat from water by evaporating a small portion of water that is recirculated through the unit.

The mixing of warm water and cooler air releases latent heat of vaporization, causing a cooling effect to the water.  Cooling towers are a key component of many refrigeration systems and can be found in industries such as chemical processing plants, power plants, steel mills, food processing plants, and many other manufacturing companies where process cooling is required.  Cooling towers are also used to provide comfort cooling for large commercial buildings such as universities, government facilities, airports, schools, hospitals, and hotels.

The video below provides a short review of what cooling towers are and why they are important.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Corrosion Resistant Cooling Towers

corrosion resistant HDPE cooling tower
One variant of corrosion resistant cooling tower
Image courtesy Delta Cooling Towers
Cooling towers rank highly as included components of heat rejection systems. Building and facility HVAC and industrial process cooling commonly rely on cooling towers as the final phase of transferring heat from inside a system, such as a building, to the outdoor environment. With most relying on the evaporation of water as the means to efficiently move large amounts of heat, cooling towers contain large wetted surfaces in almost continuous contact with solutions of water and various chemicals used to maintain certain fluid conditions. The heat transfer solutions can be aggressive, and many towers are constructed using metal for the wetted parts and case of the unit. This has traditionally been an area of concern with cooling tower ownership, since the combined elements of water, treatment chemicals, and time take their inevitable toll on the equipment.

Avoiding the deterioration of metal clad cooling towers is construction utilizing high-density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE is not impacted by water, treatment chemicals, or elements often present in the air, whether harsh chemical vapors emitted from nearby industrial plants or natural corrosives such as salt air.

Delta Cooling Towers, Inc., based in New Jersey, USA, manufactures HDPE cooling towers and possesses an extensive portfolio of completed successful applications utilizing HDPE construction features. Below is a short case study showing how one industrial user benefited from installing HDPE cooling towers.

Read the case study and get more information from an application specialist. See how incorporating HDPE cooling towers into your operation can reduce maintenance burden and lead to longer machinery life.

In any business venture or other organization, relying on doing things the way they have always been done can be detrimental to real progress and improvement. Incorporating change involves risk, but good planning and careful analysis will increase the probability of success.


Thursday, November 16, 2017

Forced Draft Cooling Tower With 20 Year Warranty

corrosion resistant HDPE cooling tower rated 50 tons with forced draft
Forced draft corrosion resistant cooling tower
with forced draft, rated 50 tons. Pioneer series.
Image courtesy Delta Cooling Towers
Delta Cooling Towers specializes in the design and construction of corrosion resistant cooling towers and similar equipment. Much of the tower construction is HDPE or other non-metallic material, enabling the company to offer a 20 year warranty on their equipment.

Cooling towers are employed worldwide in HVAC applications and process fluid cooling. In addition to their industry leading corrosion resistance, Delta Cooling Towers also offers anti-microbial protection which combats the growth of microbes responsible for Legionnaires Disease and other respiratory ailments. The various product lines cover heat transfer capacities to accommodate any installation.

There is a lexicon employed in the description of cooling tower performance and operation. Some commonly used terms, along with their meaning, is provided below. The terms and their meanings is pulled from the owner's manual provided by Delta Cooling Towers for their Pioneer series of forced draft cooling towers.

Share your process and HVAC cooling challenges with application experts, leveraging your own knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.

Cooling Tower Terms and Definitions

  • BTU - A BTU is the heat energy required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit in the range from 32° F. to 212° F.
  • Cooling Range - The difference in temperature between the hot water entering the tower and the cold water leaving the tower is the cooling range.
  • Approach - The difference between the temperature of the cold water leaving the tower and the wet-bulb temperature of the air is known as the approach. The approach fixes the operating temperature of the tower and is a most important parameter in determining both tower size and cost.
  • Drift - The water entrained in the air flow and discharged to the atmosphere. Drift loss does not include water lost by evaporation. Proper tower design and operation can minimize drift loss.
  • Heat Load - The amount of heat to be removed from the circulating water through the tower. Heat load is equal to water circulation rate (gpm) times the cooling range times 500 and is expressed in BTU/hr. Heat load is also an important parameter in determining tower size and cost.
  • Ton - An evaporative cooling ton is 15,000 BTU's per hour.
  • Wet-Bulb Temperature - The lowest temperature that water theoretically can reach by evaporation. Wet-Bulb Temperature is an extremely important parameter in tower selection and design and should be measured by a psychrometer.
  • Pumping Head - The pressure required to pump the water from the tower basin, through the entire system and return to the top of the tower.
  • Make-Up - The amount of water required to replace normal losses caused by bleedoff, drift, and evaporation.
  • Bleed Off (Blowdown) - The circulating water in the tower which is discharged to waste to help keep the dissolved solids concentrating in the water below a maximum allowable limit. As a result of evaporation, dissolved solids concentration will continually increase unless reduced by bleed off.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Cooling Towers: Operating Principles and Systems

evaporative cooling tower made of HDPE plastic
Example of evaporative cooling tower, fabricated
from HDPE plastic to resist corrosion.
Image courtesy Delta Cooling Towers
The huge, perfectly shaped cylindrical towers stand tall amidst a landscape, with vapor billowing from their spherical, open tops into the blue sky. Such an image usually provokes a thought related to nuclear power or a mysterious energy inaccessible to the millions of people who drive by power plants every day. In reality, cooling towers – whether the hyperboloid structures most often associated with the aforementioned nuclear power plants or their less elegantly shaped cousins – are essential, process oriented tools that serve as the final step in removing heat from a process or facility. The cooling towers at power plants serve as both an adjuster of a control variable essential to the process and also as a fascinating component of the process behind power creation. The importance and applicability of cooling towers is extensive, making them fundamentally useful for industrial operations in power generation, oil refining, petrochemical plants, commercial/industrial HVAC, and process cooling.

In principle, an evaporative cooling tower involves the movement of a fluid, usually water with some added chemicals, through a series of parts or sections to eventually result in the reduction of its heat content and temperature. Liquid heated by the process operation is pumped through pipes to reach the tower, and then gets sprayed through nozzles or other distribution means onto the ‘fill’ of the tower, reducing the velocity of the liquid to increase the fluid dwell time in the fill area. The fill area is designed to maximize the liquid surface area, increasing contact between water and air. Electric motor driven fans force air into the tower and across the fill area. As air passes across the liquid surface, a portion of the water evaporates, transferring heat from the water to the air and reducing in the water temperature. The cooled water is then collected and pumped back to the process-related equipment allowing for the cycle to repeat. The process and associated dispersion of heat allows for the cooling tower to be classified as a heat rejection device, transferring waste heat from the process or operation to the atmosphere.

Evaporative cooling towers rely on outdoor air conditions being such that evaporation will occur at a rate sufficient to transfer the excess heat contained in the water solution. Analysis of the range of outdoor air conditions at the installation site is necessary to assure proper operation of the cooling tower throughout the year. Evaporative cooling towers are of an open loop design, with the fluid exposed to air.

A closed loop cooling tower, sometimes referred to as a fluid cooler, does not directly expose the heat transfer fluid to the air. The heat exchanger can take many forms, but a finned coil is common. A closed loop system will generally be less efficient that an open loop design because only sensible heat is recovered from the fluid in the closed loop system. A closed loop fluid cooler can be advantageous for smaller heat loads, or in facilities without sufficient technical staff to monitor or maintain operation of an evaporative cooling tower.

Thanks to their range of applications, cooling towers vary in size from the monolithic structures utilized by power plants to small rooftop units. Removing the heat from the water used in cooling systems allows for the recycling of the heat transfer fluid back to the process or equipment that is generating heat. This cycle of heat transfer enables heat generating processes to remain stable and secure. The cooling provided by an evaporative tower allows for the amount of supply water to be vastly lower than the amount which would be otherwise needed. No matter whether the cooling tower is small or large, the components of the tower must function as an integrated system to ensure both adequate performance and longevity. Understanding elements which drive performance - variable flow capability, potential HVAC ‘free cooling’, the splash type fill versus film type fill, drift eliminators, nozzles, fans, and driveshaft characteristics - is essential to the success of the cooling tower and its use in both industrial and commercial settings.

Design or selection of an evaporative cooling tower is an involved process, requiring examination and analysis of many facets. Share your heat transfer requirements and challenges with cooling tower specialists, combining your own facilities and process knowledge and experience with their application expertise to develop an effective solution.`

Saturday, April 29, 2017

Dual Application for Cooling Tower

Plastic cooling tower air stripper
Plastic cooling tower assembly
Courtesy Delta Cooling Towers
Cooling towers are readily identified by their ubiquitous presence in large commercial cooling systems. They are an effective means of rejecting heat from from a centralized liquid system. The general operating principle of a cooling tower involves a thermal and mass transfer from the cooling water to the surrounding air. The water is distributed by a number of means throughout the cooling tower fill, drastically expanding the surface area of the water. Air from the surrounding atmosphere is moved across the water surface. Assuming that the air is within the performance range of the cooling tower, the resulting evaporation of a portion of the water cools the liquid water remaining behind.

There are other applications for cooling towers, and Delta Cooling Towers, Inc., described one in a March 2017 news post. The application centered around a municipality with two challenges in providing potable water to residents. The water was being sourced from very deep wells and, without treatment, had an unacceptably high delivery temperature. Additionally, the sourced groundwater exhibited unacceptable levels of radon and hydrogen sulfide, naturally occurring gaseous contaminants that required level reductions to render the water suitable for human consumption and use.

Air strippers, equipment that aerates the water, are a common means of reducing the gaseous contaminant levels. In this case, though, there was the additional challenge of reducing the water temperature. All needed to be accomplished at process flow rates commensurate with the size of the municipal water demand.
A solution that solved both issues arose with the use of a cooling tower selected to provide sufficient aeration for gaseous contaminant reduction and cooling of the water to acceptable levels.
You can access the entire case history by reaching out to a product specialist, with whom you should share your own liquid processing challenges. Combining your process knowledge and experience with the product application expertise of knowledgeable professionals will produce effective solutions.

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Closed Loop Cooling - Alternative Setup Delivers Benefits

Industrial processing often requires the transfer of heat, sometimes into the process, sometimes out of the process. External heat sources are often steam, hot water, or electric heaters. There are also instances where processing machinery either adds heat to the process or requires heat removal (cooling) in order to maintain proper function. If the heat source can accommodate a flowing liquid to provide removal of excess heat, it is a candidate for a closed loop cooling system.

One schematic for a closed loop cooling circuit would show the heat source connected to the piping system, with a pump for circulation and a finned coil located outdoors. The pump moves the heat transfer liquid through the hot area where heat moves from the process to the flowing liquid. The heated liquid continues to flow through the piping system to the finned coil, located outdoors. A fan moves air across the coil to provide heat transfer. The finned coil size would need to be comparatively large, since only sensible cooling using the forced air is employed. The fan capacity would be commensurate with the coil size and the circulating pump rating would be in line with the fluid moving requirements of the system. While this design is fairly simple, there may be a more efficient way to accomplish the heat transfer and deliver what may be beneficial additional features.

Consider a different schematic for the same application. This alternate design employs a closed loop cooling circuit for the heat source, but utilizes a different means of rejecting the heat from the closed loop to the outside air. A plate and frame heat exchanger transfers heat from the closed cooling loop to an open loop circuit that circulates through a cooling tower located outdoors. This scenario maintains the closed loop nature of the equipment cooling circuit, preventing entry of particulates or dissolved gases into the cooling fluid circulating through the process or machinery. Here is what the schematic looks like, courtesy of Delta Cooling Towers .
closed loop cooling system schematic with cooling tower
Closed loop cooling of process heat source using plat and frame heat exchanger and induced draft cooling tower
Courtesy Delta Cooling Towers
The cooling tower offers far greater efficiency than the fan and coil arrangement in the first design. Employing a plastic cooling tower will drastically reduce the life cycle cost over a galvanized steel model and the cooling tower will occupy significantly less space and require less costly support structure than the larger fan and coil arrangement. Total horsepower requirements for the system are reduced. The closed loop will not require any chemical additions for freeze protection because it no longer extends outdoors. This system also provides an element of flexibility, with expansion of the plate and frame heat exchanger a possibility. Cooling tower capacity is also expandable and available for other uses throughout the facility.

There are more details provided in the datasheet included below. Share your heat transfer and cooling challenges with application experts and explore various options. The combination of your process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise will produce an effective solution.


Monday, September 12, 2016

New Anti-microbial Cooling Tower From Delta Cooling Towers

Delta Cooling Towers, globally recognized leader in the manufacture of corrosion resistant cooling towers, has added a new dimension to their product line. Cooling towers for industrial and commercial applications are now available with construction features and materials that significantly inhibit the growth of microorganisms in the tower fill and shell.

Microbial growth has long been a concern of cooling tower operators. The environment within a tower, continuously wet and warm, provides ample opportunity for microbial propagation. The new anti-microbial cooling towers make use of HDPE resin that is fully compounded (not just on surface) with an anti-microbial agent to provide the corrosion protection for which Delta is known, along with resistance to biofilm growth. The fill in the tower also provides the same level of resistance to microorganism growth. The corrosion resistant materials used in the construction of Delta towers allows the use of more aggressive chemical treatment than would be recommended with metal cooling towers.

The new Delta Cooling Towers have some distinct advantages for health and safety, as well as extended operating lifetime. Reach out to a product application specialist. Get all the details on the new anti-microbial cooling towers and share your HVAC and industrial cooling challenges to get solutions.



Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Corrosion Resistant Cooling Towers Allow Aggressive Water Treatment

cooling tower corrosion resistant plastic construction
Corrosion resistant cooling tower
Courtesy Delta Cooling Towers
Unless you are located in the northern or southern polar regions, churning away on the roof of the building in which you may work, or mounted on a pad adjacent to it, is likely an important unit of equipment. It is essential to climate control in the building, and possibly an integral heat rejection component for an industrial process. Yes, I am talking about cooling towers. While hardly glamorous, without their successful operation, much of your operation will grind to a halt. 

There is substantial cost involved in the operation of a cooling tower, including energy, water, treatment chemicals, and more. Corrosion and the accumulation of fouling material can measurably reduce overall cooling efficiency. Even modest accumulation can slash energy efficiency by 5%, increasing operating costs in a marked way.

Keeping a cooling tower operating near its design capacity requires a commitment to a regular maintenance and inspection schedule. When deficiencies are found, they should be corrected within a reasonably short time frame. Water treatment, to improve performance or reduce maintenance burden, can sometimes be overly aggressive and impart some negative side effects to the equipment. Plastic cooling towers provide a high level of resistance to even the most aggressive water treatment chemicals. Cooling towers fabricated from plastics can carry warranties extending to 20 years.

Water cooling towers are an important operational component of your infrastructure, as well as a significant continuing cost center. They should be cared for as an important appliance. Avoid choosing a "Run to failure" maintenance program.

There is much to consider when adding or replacing a cooling tower. Share your project requirements and challenges with an application specialist. Combining your process and operational expertise with their product application knowledge will produce an effective solution.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Delta Cooling Towers - News Update

AHR Expo announcement for Delta Cooling Towers
Delta Cooling Towers
Exhibiting at AHR Expo 2016
Delta Cooling Towers manufactures corrosion resistant cooling towers for commercial and industrial applications where these product features are important:
  • Seamless double wall engineered plastic (HDPE) shell
  • Corrosion proof construction
  • Direct drive fan system
  • Totally enclosed VFD rated motors
  • Factory assembled for simple installation
  • 20 Year shell warranty
  • PVC water distribution system with non-clog large orifice removable nozzles
  • High efficiency PVC fill
  • Made in the USA
Mountain States Engineering and Controls (MSEC) represents the manufacturer in Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana You can visit the Delta Cooling Towers booth at AHR Expo January 25 - 27 in Orlando, Florida. 

Corrosion resistant cooling tower for HVAC or industrial cooling
HDPE Cooling Tower
Courtesy Delta Cooling Towers

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Cooling Tower Case Study: HDPE vs. Metal Clad

HDPE constructed cooling tower
HDPE Constructed Cooling Tower
Courtesy Delta Cooling Towers
In any business venture or other organization, relying on doing things the way they have always been done can be detrimental to real progress and improvement. Certainly, incorporating change has risk, but careful consideration and planning can make deciding upon and implementing change a big win for an organization.

Cooling towers are common elements of heat rejection systems, like building HVAC and industrial process cooling. By design, cooling towers have large wetted surfaces in almost continuous contact with aggressive solutions of water and various chemicals used to maintain certain fluid conditions. Many towers are constructed using metal for the wetted parts and case of the unit. This has traditionally been an area of concern with cooling tower ownership, since the combined elements of water, treatment chemicals, and time take their inevitable toll on the equipment.

There is a good solution to the deterioration of metal clad cooling towers. Construction utilizing high-density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE is impervious to corrosive water treatment chemicals and elements often present in the air, whether harsh chemical vapors emitted from nearby industrial plants or natural corrosives such as salt air.

Delta Cooling Towers, Inc. is a US based manufacturer of HDPE cooling towers with a substantial portfolio of completed projects. Below is a short case study showing how one industrial user benefited from installing HDPE cooling towers.

Read the case study and get more information from an application specialist. See how incorporating HDPE cooling towers into your operation can reduce maintenance burden and lead to longer machinery life.

Monday, October 5, 2015

Cooling Tower Corrosion Resistance - It's Easy

Corrosion resistant cooling tower installation
Corrosion resistant cooling tower
Courtesy Delta Cooling Towers
Machinery that will be continuously bathed in a spray of water throughout its operating life is certainly a good candidate for some corrosion protection. Locate this equipment outdoors, perhaps in a coastal area, and the potential to gain benefits from a corrosion resistant installation are more than clear.

Cooling towers fit my previous description admirably, and their scope of application makes them an essential element of facility operation. Every unit is exposed to combined effects of variable water chemistry, constant saturation at elevated temperatures, and aeration. Some cooling towers also are impacted by potentially harmful agents in the process water and various airborne pollutants, including sulfur oxides and acid rain.

For those not entirely familiar with how a cooling tower works, here are the very basics. Cooling towers transfer an amount of heat from one or more water-cooled machines or systems to outdoor air. Heated water from the water cooled systems enters the cooling tower, distributes over a heat transfer surface (sometimes called the fill), and is cooled by an induced air flow that is forced through the fill. The flowing air causes a portion of the water to evaporate, removing heat and lowering the temperature of the water. The cooled water is collected in a basin and returned to the system to repeat the heat transfer cycle.

Traditionally, cooling towers were fabricated of metal because of its structural strength and ability to be formed using readily available fabricating means. Differing metals were employed, at basic to premium price points, to provide increased levels of resistance to the ever present corroding nature of water and weather. Many cooling towers built today employ the same, or similar, materials and methods used decades ago. There is, and has been for quite some time now, a modern alternative to metal cooling tower construction that provides substantially increased levels of corrosion resistance at a competitive price point.

Delta Cooling Towers, Inc. manufactures cooling towers using structural and other plastics, enabling them to provide a 20 year warranty covering the basic structure of the unit. The product line provides capacity and performance range to cover almost any requirement. If you are in the business of specifying heat rejection equipment for your own facility, or one of your client's, you should get more detailed information about this equipment. Have a discussion about your application requirements, and concerns about operational longevity, with a product specialist. Good decisions come from combining the knowledge and experience of many.

As a quick reference, included below is a list of materials used in the construction of the Delta Cooling Towers unit. A quick glance by anyone familiar with the corrosion susceptibility of metals used in tower construction will see that the superior performance of the plastic materials should be given serious consideration on a cooling tower project.


Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Wet Cooling Towers

Cooling tower (courtesy
of Delta Cooling Tower)
Water cooling towers are some of the most essential pieces of equipment for commercial and industrial buildings today.

Cooling towers may either use the evaporation of water to remove process heat to cool the process fluid, or may use forced or convective air to cool the process fluid.

Wet cooling towers use the natural process of evaporation (of water) to cool equipment.  They rely on an exchange of heat between the equipment, the water in the tower, and the air passing through the tower.

Excess process heat is absorbed by the water in the cooling tower as it passes through a labyrinth of fins and tubes in the structure. As the water is warmed, it comes into direct contact with cool air passing through the tower. The interaction between cool air and warm water causes the warmest water droplets to evaporate and is released out of the tower into the atmosphere. The remaining water cools back down and can be reused through the system again.

Common applications include cooling the circulating water used in refineries, chemical plants, power stations and HVAC systems for cooling buildings. Due to the cost-effectiveness and readily available supply of water, companies use wet cooling towers to provide cooling continuously and cheaply.

While cooling towers are normally defined as “a heat rejection device which rejects waste heat to the atmosphere through the cooling of a water stream to a lower temperature”,  one must keep in mind that the “waste heat” emissions are just water droplets, and are not harmful to the atmosphere nor to the environment.

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Applying Cooling Towers

Delta Cooling Tower
Delta Cooling Tower
Here is a presentation that explains how to apply cooling towers, including the basic cooling tower principles, design considerations, and construction issues.

The original presentation given in 2009 by Steve Lowe, PE to the Hampton Roads, VA Chapter of ASHRAE.






For more information on any cooling tower issue in Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, Montana, Utah, Nevada, Idaho, or the western Dakotas, contact:

Mountain States Engineering and Controls
1520 Iris Street
Lakewood, CO 80215
303.232.4100 Phone
303.232.4900 Fax
Email: info@mnteng.com
www.mnteng.com

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Basics of Heat Transfer


basic heat transfer
Heat moves from hot to cold
(image courtesy of ces.fau.edu)
In nature, the laws of physics will continually drive energy in an attempt to reach equilibrium. In a thermal loop, as long as there is a temperature difference, heat moves away from the warmer entity to the cooler entity.

Heat exchangers facilitate this phenomena with tube bundles and vessels which separates the hot medium from the cold. Heat penetrates the surface of the tubes and is transferred to the contents of the vessel, thereby heating or cooling fluids or gases in the vessel or in the tubes.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Cooling Tower Terms and Definitions

Delta Cooling Tower
Delta Cooling Tower
(definitions courtesy of Delta)
Cooling Tower Terms and Definitions

BTU (British Thermal Unit) A BTU is the heat energy required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit in the range from 32° F to 212° F

Cooling Range The difference in temperature between the hot water entering the tower and the cold water leaving the tower is the cooling range.

Approach The difference between the temperature of the cold water leaving the tower and the wet- bulb temperature of the air is known as the approach. Establishment of the approach fixes the operating temperature of the tower and is a most important parameter in determining both tower size and cost.

Drift The water entrained in the air flow and discharged to the atmosphere. Drift loss does not include water lost by evaporation. Proper tower design can minimize drift loss.

Heat Load The amount of heat to be removed from the circulating water within the tower. Heat load is equal to water circulation rate (gpm) times the cooling range times 500 and is expressed in BTU/hr. Heat load is also an important parameter in determining tower size and cost.

Ton An evaporative cooling ton is 15,000 BTU’s per hour.

Wet-Bulb Temperature The lowest temperature that water theoretically can reach by evaporation. Wet-Bulb temperature is an extremely important parameter in tower selection and design and should be measured by a psychrometer

Pumping Head The pressure required to pump the water from the tower basin, through the entire system and return to the top of the tower.

Makeup The amount of water required to replace normal losses caused by bleed off, drift, and evaporation.

Bleed Off The circulating water in the tower which is discharged to waste to help keep the dissolved solids concentration of the water below a maximum allowable limit. As a result of evaporation, dissolved solids concentration will continually increase unless reduced by bleed off.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Natural Draft and Mechanical Draft Cooling Tower Fundamentals

Cooling Tower
Delta Cooling Tower
In many industrial facilities, various pieces of equipment, as well as many fluids used in process systems need to be cooled.  This cooling is mostly done with water. However, as cooling water is used, it absorbs heat, and loses its cooling effectiveness. The water needs to be kept cool.

Disposing of hot water in to ponds or basins can be detrimental to the environment. It’s also costly to replace the discharged water. The more efficient means is to cool the hot water and reuse it.

The equipment most commonly used to do this is the cooling tower. Cooling towers are part of a cooling water system in a commercial or industrial facility.

The main components of a typical cooling tower are a circulating pump, a shell and tube heat exchanger, and fluid lines.