Showing posts with label differential pressure. Show all posts
Showing posts with label differential pressure. Show all posts

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Orifice Plate - Primary Flow Element

orifice plate drawing
Orifice plates are simple in appearance, but exhibit
precision machining.
Image courtesy of Fabrotech Industries
An orifice plate, at its simplest, is a plate with a machined hole in it. Carefully control the size and shape of the hole, mount the plate in a fluid flow path, measure the difference in fluid pressure between the two sides of the plate, and you have a simple flow measurement setup. The primary flow element is the differential pressure across the orifice. It is the measurement from which flow rate is inferred. The differential pressure is proportional to the square of the flow rate.

An orifice plate is often mounted in a customized holder or flange union that allows removal and inspection of the plate. A holding device also facilitates replacement of a worn orifice plate or insertion of one with a different size orifice to accommodate a change in the process. While the device appears simple, much care is applied to the design and manufacture of orifice plates. The flow data obtained using an orifice plate and differential pressure depend upon well recognized characteristics of the machined opening, plate thickness, and more. With the pressure drop characteristics of the orifice fixed and known, the measuring precision for differential pressure becomes a determining factor in the accuracy of the flow measurement.

There are standards for the dimensional precision of orifice plates that address:
  • Circularity of the bore
  • Flatness
  • Parallelism of the faces
  • Edge sharpness
  • Surface condition
Orifice plates can be effectively "reshaped" by corrosion or by material deposits that may accumulate from the measured fluid. Any distortion of the plate surface or opening has the potential to induce measurable error. This being the case, flow measurement using an orifice plate is best applied with clean fluids.

Certain aspects of the mounting of the orifice plate may also have an impact on its adherence to the calibrated data for the device. Upstream and downstream pipe sections, concentric location of the orifice in the pipe, and location of the pressure measurement taps must be considered.

Properly done, an orifice plate and differential pressure flow measurement setup provides accurate and stable performance. Share your flow measurement challenges of all types with a specialist, combining your own process knowledge and experience with their product application expertise to develop an effective solution.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Summary of Technologies Used For Continuous Liquid Level Measurement in Industrial Process Control

differential pressure transmitter with purge control for downpipe measurement
Differential pressure liquid level transmitter with
integrated downpipe purge control (bubbler method)
Courtesy King-Gage
Automated liquid processing operations in many fields have requirements for accurate and reliable level measurement. The variety of media and application criteria demand continuous improvement in the technology, while still retaining niches for older style units utilizing methods that, through their years of reliable service, inspire confidence in operators.

Here is a synopsis of the available technologies for instruments providing continuous liquid level measurement. All are generally available in the form of transmitters with 4-20 mA output signals, and most are provided with additional outputs and communications. What is notably not covered here are level switches or level gauges that do not deliver a continuous output signal corresponding to liquid level.

Whether considering a new installation or upgrading an existing one, it can be a good exercise to review several technologies as possible candidates for a project. None of the technologies would likely be considered the best choice for all applications. Evaluating and selecting the best fit for a project can be facilitated by reaching out to a product application specialist, sharing your applications challenges and combining your process knowledge with their product expertise to develop an effective solution.

Displacer – A displacer is essentially a float and a spring that are characterized for a particular liquid and range of surface level movement. The displacer moves in response to liquid level, changing the location of a core connected to the displacer by a stem. The core is within a linear variable differential transformer. The electrical output of the transformer changes as the core moves.

Guided Wave Radar – A radar based technology that uses a waveguide extending into the liquid. The radar signal travels through the waveguide, basically a tube. The liquid surface level creates a dielectric condition that generates a reflection. Calculations and processing of the emitted and returned signals provide a measure of distance to the liquid surface. No moving parts.

Magnetostrictive – A method employing measurement of the transit time of an electric pulse along a wire extending down an enclosed tube oriented vertically in the media. A magnetic float on the exterior of the tube moves with the liquid surface. The float’s magnetic field produces the return signal to the sensor. Processing the time from emission to return provides a measure of distance to the liquid surface.

Pulse Burst Radar - A radar based technology employing emissions in precisely timed bursts. The emission is reflectex from the liquid surface and transit time from emission to return is used to determine distance to media surface.  Not adversely impacted by changes in media conductivity, density, pressure, temperature. No moving parts.

Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave Radar – Another radar based technology that employs a radar signal that sweeps linearly across a range of frequencies. Signal processing determines distance to media surface.  Not adversely impacted by changes in media conductivity, density, pressure, temperature. No moving parts.

RF Capacitance - As media rises and falls in the tank, the amount of capacitance developed between the sensing probe and the ground reference (usually the side metal sidewall) also rises and falls. This change in capacitance is converted into a proportional 4-20 mA output signal. Requires contact between the media and the sensor, as well as a good ground reference. No moving parts.

Ultrasonic Non-Contact – Ultrasonic emission from above the liquid is reflected off the surface. The transit time between emission and return are used to calculate the distance to the liquid surface. No contact with media and no moving parts.

Differential Pressure – Pressure sensor at the bottom of a vessel measures the pressure developed by the height of the liquid in the tank. No moving parts. A variation of this method is often called a bubbler, which essentially measures hydrostatic pressure exerted on  the gas in a tube extending into the contained liquid. It has the advantage of avoiding contact between the measuring instrument parts, with the exception of the dip tube, and the subject liquid.

Laser - Probably one of the latest arrivals on the liquid level measurement scene, laser emission and return detection is used with time interval measuring to accurately determine the distance from the sensor source to the liquid surface.

Load Cell - A load cell or strain gauge can be incorporated into the support structure of the liquid containing vessel. Changes in the liquid level in the vessel are detected as distortions to the structure and converted, using tank geometry and specific gravity of the liquid.

All of these technologies have their own set of attributes which may make them more suitable to a particular range of applications. Consulting with a product specialist will help determine which technologies are the best fit for your application.

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Downpipe Liquid Level Sensor Purge Control

Downpipe bubbler type tank level indicator
Arrangement for bubbler type tank level indicator
with purge control
Courtesy King Gage
Industrial process control often requires the measurement of liquid inventory volume or mass. If the material is contained within a tank of known shape and dimensions, the volume can be determined accurately by measuring the level of the liquid. Various means are used to determine the liquid level. One of the simplest is the downpipe sensor, sometimes referred to as a "bubbler", where liquid level is inferentially derived using differential pressure. The downpipe is a length of pipe that is open at the end extending down into the liquid contained within the tank. The top end is connected to a purging device that provides a controlled flow of pressurized air or gas into the pipe. The pressure maintained within the downpipe will reach an equilibrium with the pressure produced by the hydrostatic force related to liquid level in the tank or vessel. Accurate measurement of this pressure, along with a thorough knowledge of the liquid's properties, can be used to determine the depth of the liquid within the tank and the corresponding volume.

King-Gage manufactures several industrial process level measurement devices incorporating downpipe purge technology and differential pressure measurement. They have applications in inventory monitoring, process control, hazardous and explosion zones, ballast monitoring, and other areas that benefit from their simple operation, low maintenance, and ruggedness. The company, in its own words describes the unit as an...
...extremely rugged unit designed specifically for hazardous areas requiring flameproof or ATEX (Ex d) rating. A proprietary wet check assembly ensures positive seal of fluids to ensure containment integrity. Loop powered transmitter provides 4-20mAdc output while components are isolated from the process media by a continuous air purge. Total consumption rate is less than 0.083 scfm for energy saving operation with external air/gas supply.The only internal element is a simple length of pipe extending into the tank.
Rugged design requires no setup or air flow adjustment due to its differential pressure regulation that avoids dynamic pressure drops common to other bubblers. This ensures highly accurate level measurement and repeatability within ± 0.2% while preventing turbulence or foaming of tank liquid. Applications include water/wastewater, sulfur pits, most free flowing liquids (including slurries) and temperatures in excess of 160 °C (320 °F) as the transmitter is effectively isolated from the process by the air purge.
The slides below illustrate various installation configurations, including one for explosion hazard areas. Contact an application engineer for more detailed information.


Friday, April 10, 2015

Electrical Pressure Sensor Types

Here is an introduction to the basics of electrical pressure sensors, from Tony Kuphaldt's Lessons in Industrial Instrumentation.

This presentation explains how a variety of electrical pressure sensors work, including piezoresistive (strain gage), differential capacitance, and resonance sensors.

Sensor principles, sensor mounting and associated hardware design for pressure transmitters and differential pressure transmitters are also described.

Click on the image below to open the presentation (viewable on all devices).


pressure sensors
Click on image to see presentation.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Pressure Measurement for Industrial Applications


digital pressure gauge
Digital Pressure Gauge
(Winters)
Pressure measurement is critical in many processes and essential in many industries. There are many techniques used to measurement pressure and vacuum (negative pressure). Instruments used to measure pressure are called pressure gauges, switches and transmitters.

Fluid pressure is defined as the measure of force on a surface, per some unit of area, perpendicular to the surface. The standard unit of measurement for pressure measurement in the English system is PSI, or pounds per square inch. In countries that use the Metric system, the Pascal (Pa) or the Newton/meter (N/m2) is used.