Showing posts with label heat exchanger. Show all posts
Showing posts with label heat exchanger. Show all posts

Saturday, June 30, 2018

Replacement Plates and Gaskets for All Brands and Models of Heat Exchangers

WCR heat exchangers
WCR heat exchanger.
Mountain States Engineering and Controls is pleased to partner with WCR, Inc. to provide new plate and frame heat exchangers, as well as replacement plates and gaskets for all brands and models.

Replacement plates and gaskets Available for these manufacturers:
  • Alfa Laval
  • APV 
  • GEA
  • Mueller
  • Tranter
  • Sigma
  • Sondex
  • SWEP
  • ITT Standard
  • Bell & Gossett
  • Vicarb
  • Chester Jensen
  • Schmidt-Bretten
  • Cherry-Burrell
With over 20,000 plates in stock at all times, WCR has the ability to offer immediate shipment on most requests. Their turnaround time and price is unmatched in the industry and WCR guarantees every plate sold with equal or longer warranty periods compared to the original manufacturer. From a single plate to an entire plate pack, WCR can deliver your requirements.

WCR heat exchanger plates are designed to be direct replacements for all OEM model plate heat exchangers listed above. WCR has reverse engineered the exact plate specifications to maintain nameplate performance for any plate heat exchanger. The quality and precision of WCR parts is impeccable.

All gasketed plate heat exchangers require maintenance at some point in their lifetime.  Gaskets should be replaced periodically to maintain function and avoid unnecessary shutdowns. WCR has excellent replacement gaskets for your heat exchanger.

WCR Inc. is a leading global producer of new replacement plate and gaskets for all brands and models of plate heat exchangers. Typical plate materials are Stainless Steel (SS304, SS316), Hastelloy, Nickel, SMO254, and Titanium.  For your gasket requirements, WCR carries over 200,000 gaskets in NBR (Nitrile), HNBR, EPDM (Butyl), Neoprene, Hypalon, and Viton®.  FDA variations of NBR and EPDM are available.

For more information or to inquire about your replacement plate or gasket requirement, please follow this link.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Case Study From CSB: Industrial Plant Heat Exchanger Explosion

large shell and tube heat exchangers at industrial chemical plant
Primary and secondary heat exchangers, similar to the setup
in the re-enactment video
Industrial accidents, whether minor or catastrophic, can serve as sources of learning when analyzed and studied. Operators, owners, and technicians involved with industrial chemical operations have a degree of moral, ethical, and legal responsibility to conduct work in a reasonably and predictably safe manner without endangering personnel, property, or the environment. Part of a diligent safety culture should include reviewing industrial accidents at other facilities. There is much to learn from these unfortunate events, even when they happen in an industry that may seem somewhat removed from our own.

The U.S. Chemical Safety Board, or CSB, is an independent federal agency that investigates industrial chemical accidents. Below, find one of their video reenactments and analysis of an explosion that occurred at a Louisiana chemical processing plant in 2013. A portion of the reenactment shows how a few seemingly innocuous oversights can combine with other unrecognized conditions that result in a major conflagration.

Check out the video and sharpen your senses to to be aware of potential trouble spots in your own operation.

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Specially Designed Heat Exchangers Deliver Hot Water on Demand

plate heat exchanger steam to water Spirax Sarco
Plate heat exchanger for producing hot water from steam
Courtesy Spirax Sarco
Hot water is readily available on demand from your steam system with the application of a properly configured heat exchanger. The installation of a well designed steam to water heat exchanger can deliver large or small demand volumes of hot water efficiently and with little need for maintenance or attention.

Spirax Sarco, globally recognized leader in steam and condensate system solutions, provides complete pre-engineered heat exchanger packages for adding hot water production to a steam system. The company combines their renowned control components with a plate or shell and tube heat exchanger, all performance matched to provide optimum performance in a single package.

  • Compact design requires minimum footprint.
  • Control valves specifically designed for steam service deliver efficient operation and long service life with minimal maintenance.
  • Condensate removal system eliminates backup of condensate in steam space for maximized efficiency.
  • A single source for the entire unit assures a coordinated installation.
  • Low maintenance requirements.
  • All piping connections on one side for easy installation.
  • Hot water on demand reduces or eliminates the need to store hot water.
There is more to learn. Additional detail is provided in the document included below. Reach out to a steam system specialist with your questions, requirements, and steam system challenges. Combine your facility and process knowledge with their product application expertise to develop effective solutions.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Replacing Heat Exchanger Tube Bundles

heat exchangers outdoors at oil refinery
Heat exchangers of many sizes are used throughout industry
Heat, a well recognized energy component of countless industrial processes. Heat exchangers are employed to move or transfer heat between two media, and are available in a wide variety of designs and configurations. They are manufactured from materials and in forms to accommodate the specific performance requirements of each process, machine, or operation.

The shell and tube heat exchanger is one common type of this heat transfer device that can be found in many commercial buildings and industrial plants. The unit is comprised of a vessel, or shell, with an array of tubes contained within. One fluid will flood the shell, encompassing the tubes through which a second fluid passes. The contact between the fluid within the shell and the outer surface of the tubes facilitates the transfer of heat energy between the two media. Applications for shell and tube units typically involve two liquids or one liquid and steam. They are not suitable for applications involving air streams.

Eventually, all heat exchangers need either major overhaul or replacement. Tubes tend to deteriorate faster than the shell, so replacement of the tube bundle can breathe extra life into a heat exchanger. Original documentation provided with the unit, plus a physical inspection, should provide all the information needed to have a new tube bundle manufactured. Numerous sources are available for replacement tube bundles, with the original manufacturer being only one potential source.
The replacing of a heat exchanger is also a good time to examine the performance delivered by the existing unit. Was it a limiting factor in the operation of the process? If so, perhaps this may be an opportunity to build in some headroom. Whatever the case, recognize that bringing in a product specialist with experience and knowledge will provide the beneficial leverage you need to get the job done right and finished on time.

Monday, May 16, 2016

Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger Fundamentals

shell and tube heat exchanger diagram and cutaway view
Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger
Shell and tube heat exchanges are found throughout fluid based industrial process control operations where heat must be transferred between two closed fluid systems. There are numerous design variants intended to provide levels of performance tailored to specific process requirements.

Provided below is a white paper that illustrates and explains the fundamentals of heat exchanger performance for shell and tube units. Covered are the three modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. Three sample application cases are covered, showing how the formulas are applied, and illustrations provide for even better understanding of basic operating principals. The article is sure to refresh or enhance your heat exchanger knowledge.

MSEC brings many years of heat exchanger application experience to bear on your application requirements. Share your new or drop-in replacement heat exchanger challenges with MSEC and work toward the best installed solution.



Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Replacing Finned Tube Heat Exchangers...When There Is No Documentation

Refrigeration finned evaporator coil
Refrigeration evaporator coil, one of  many finned coil
and heat exchanger types
Heat is a common energy component of many industrial processes. Moving or transferring heat between two media is accomplished with a wide variety of heat exchangers, which are manufactured in forms to accommodate the specific performance requirements of each process, machine, or operation.

One type of heat exchanger is the finned tube, also called finned coil. It is commonly used when heating or cooling air, with the fins expanding the heat transfer surface of the tube for greater efficiency. Typical applications include:

  • Steam to air
  • Water to air
  • Refrigerant to air

Eventually, all heat exchangers need either major overhaul or replacement. The general practice with finned coils is to replace them. There are many circumstances that could lead to the unfortunate loss of the original design and construction information for the coil to be replaced. If faced with this dilemma, here are some of the information points you will need to have a replacement fabricated.
  • Mounting Form: How is the coil held in place within the equipment or process? Record locations and size of any mounting holes or other fixtures holding the assembly in place. If there is a frame or case for the coil, measurements and a sketch or drawing of the case will be helpful. 
  • Construction Materials: Make a schedule of all the parts of the existing assembly and the material from which each is fabricated.
  • Tubes: The outside diameter and wall thickness of the tube used in the assembly is important.
  • Media: What flows inside the tubes? What flows outside the tubes?
  • Inlet and Outlet Conditions: This is critical data that, if not already documented, will need to be determined in order to assure proper performance. The inlet and outlet (also referred to as "entering" and "leaving") conditions for both media define coil performance.
  • Connections: Size, type, and location of any media connections must be coordinated with existing conditions to make the new coil a true drop-in replacement.
  • Circuiting: Circuiting refers to the path, or paths, the media contained within the tubes will follow. This can be difficult to communicate in some cases, as the circuiting in some finned coils can be complex. Take the time to make a drawing of both ends of the existing coil, detailing the connections made by the U-shaped tubes or headers on each end. Additionally, if there are capillary or small branching tubes that extend from the main inlet connection to several circuits, detail those too. Take photos as part of your documentation.
  • Purpose and Application: Write out a description of what the heat exchanger is supposed to accomplish. Include as much detail as you know about the process media. This will be useful to the engineer attempting to process all the information you provide into a properly configured heat exchanger.
The replacing of a heat exchanger is also a good time to examine the performance delivered by the existing unit. Was it a limiting factor in the operation of the process? If so, perhaps this may be an opportunity to build in some headroom. Whatever the case, recognize that bringing in a product specialist with experience and knowledge will provide the beneficial leverage you need to get the job done right and finished on time.

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Steam Heat Exchanger Stall - Eliminate It For Best Performance

Steam Heat Exchanger
Industrial Steam Heat Exchanger
Courtesy JFD Tube & Coil Products
Efficient and reliable operation is always an objective of a steam system owner or operator. If your system employs heat exchangers, an understanding of heat exchanger stall will put you on a path to efficient operation, lower maintenance, and possibly longer useful life for major parts of your system.

Heat exchanger stall occurs when low load conditions reduce the steam pressure in the heat exchanger, decreasing the pressure differential across the steam trap to a point below the back pressure in the condensate line. The resulting condition causes condensate to back up into the heat exchanger, reducing its efficiency. There are other negative effects that are illustrated in the animated video below, produced by world recognized steam system experts Spirax Sarco and presented by Mountain States Engineering, a distributor in the Western US.

The video is useful and comprehensible to a wide range of  skill and knowledge levels. It takes only four minutes to view, and will leave you with a better understanding of how you can get consistent and efficient performance from your steam system.

For a steam system survey and evaluation, contact the engineers at Mountain States Engineering. They have the technical knowledge, products, and other resources to deliver solid and positive solutions for keeping your steam systems at peak operation.


Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Heat Exchangers for Liquid-Gas Vaporization

Tube bundle for heating
Tube bundle for heat transfer.
Hydrocarbon and non-hydrocarbon based gases can be more efficiently stored and transported in a liquified state, providing higher media density and corresponding product weight per container. Upon reaching their final destination, the liquid can be reheated, returning to a gaseous state for distribution and use. Typical liquified gases include natural gas, oxygen, butane, propane, and nitrogen.

There are several ways to affect the physical change from liquid to gas, and picking the best option is dependent on criteria such as; 1) available energy sources; 2) plant location; 3) climate conditions; and 4) plant infrastructure.

The change from liquid to gas phase usually requires one or more vessels properly sized and designed to accommodate the vastly increased volume of the evaported liquid, handle the storage or distribution pressure of the gas, and be compatible with the process media. In most plants today, the gradual process of warming the liquified gases is done with steam-heated or oil-heated "heat exchangers" or "tube bundles".

Some heat exchanger systems may, instead of steam, use steam-heated intermediary fluids such as oil, water, or glycol-water solution to provide a smoother rate of heat transfer to the evaporating liquid. This method can employ two heat exchangers, one transferring heat from steam to the intermediary fluid, then another to transfer heat from the intermediary fluid to the liquified gaseous product to evaporate it.

Steam heated, closed-loop circulation systems play an important role in providing an efficient, low-cost and compact method to accommodate liquid vaporization. Steam is available in many industrial plants, providing a comparatively inexpensive and readily available source of heat energy. Heat exchangers are available in a range of pre-engineered capacities and forms, but it is quite common for these components to be custom fabricated to meet very specific requirements. Engineers can design their own systems from the component level, or provide performance requirements to the manufacturer and have a skid mounted unit produced, ready for connection to electric power (for control systems), energy source (steam, oil or water) and process inlet and outlet lines.

These systems can be quite technical, with numerous design considerations. The path to maximized safety and efficiency includes consultation with a heat exchanger expert as part of specification and design process. A combination of your high level process knowledge and their product and application expertise will yield the best outcome.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Basics of Heat Transfer


basic heat transfer
Heat moves from hot to cold
(image courtesy of ces.fau.edu)
In nature, the laws of physics will continually drive energy in an attempt to reach equilibrium. In a thermal loop, as long as there is a temperature difference, heat moves away from the warmer entity to the cooler entity.

Heat exchangers facilitate this phenomena with tube bundles and vessels which separates the hot medium from the cold. Heat penetrates the surface of the tubes and is transferred to the contents of the vessel, thereby heating or cooling fluids or gases in the vessel or in the tubes.