Showing posts with label industrial control. Show all posts
Showing posts with label industrial control. Show all posts

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Mountain States Engineering & Controls

Mountain States Engineering & Controls is a Manufacturer's Representative & Distributor of process equipment and controls headquartered in Lakewood, Colorado since 1978. We serve the markets of Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, Montana, Utah, Nevada, Idaho, and the western Dakotas.

https://mnteng.com
303-232-4100

Monday, January 23, 2017

Appropriate Application for Pressure Regulator Valve and Back Pressure Regulator

back pressure regulator valve
One of many variants of back pressure
regulator valves
Courtesy Cash Valve
Fluids move throughout processes, driven by pressure produced with mechanical or naturally occurring means. In many cases the pressure generated by the driving source is substantially greater than what may be desired at particular process steps. In other cases, the operation may dictate that a minimum pressure be maintained within a portion of the process train. Both cases are handled by the appropriate valve type, designed specifically to regulate pressure.

A pressure regulating valve is a normally open valve that employs mechanical means, positioning itself to maintain the outlet pressure set on the valve. Generally, this type of valve has a spring that provides a countervailing force to the inlet pressure on the valve mechanism. An adjustment bolt regulates the force produced by the spring upon the mechanism, creating an equilibrium point that provides flow through the valve needed to produce the set outlet pressure. A typical application for a pressure regulator is to reduce upstream or inlet pressure to a level appropriate for downstream processing equipment.

Back pressure valves are normally closed, operating in a logically reversed fashion to pressure regulators. Where pressure regulators control outlet pressure, a back pressure valve is intended to maintain inlet pressure. Similar internals are present in the back pressure valve, with the valve action reversed when compared to a pressure regulator. An inlet pressure reduction in the back pressure valve will cause the valve to begin closing, restricting flow and increasing the inlet pressure. A representative application for a back pressure valve is a multi-port spray station. The back pressure valve will work to maintain a constant setpoint pressure to all the spray nozzles, regardless of how many may be open at a particular time.

Both of these valve types are available in an extensive array of sizes, capacities, pressure ranges, and materials of construction to accommodate every process requirement. Share your fluid control challenges with a process control specialist. Combining your process knowledge with their product application expertise will produce effective solutions.

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Keep Industrial Control System Cybersecurity Top of Mind

depiction of industrial data around the world cybersecurity
Industrial control system cyber security is a 24/7 operation 
Cybersecurity risks should be a concern to any business with an internet connection or data port. Smaller operators may feel their limited size and notoriety renders them generally immune to invasion. This is a falsehood. Every control system should be considered as a potential target. That said, paranoia and fear should not be your primary decision drivers. Cybersecurity is accomplished through awareness, diligence, and collaboration.

Even if you consider yourself a small and insignificant operator, it is useful to begin, then maintain, a connection to the conduits for industrial control system cybersecurity information. Develop your awareness of the potential for intrusion into your control system. Start to become knowledgeable about how cyber threats can impact your operation, how cyber intruders gain access. As you build your knowledge, it is likely you will find ways to improve your level of security without major change or expense.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security houses the watchdog organizations for industrial control system cybersecurity. There is a group within the department that is dedicated solely to industrial control systems. The Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team, better known as ICS-CERT, works to reduce cyber intrusion risks for industrial control systems. The link for ICS-CERT should be your first stop when delving into industrial cybersecurity. The site provides links to many other resources and activities, all directly related to cybersecurity. You can sign up for newsletters, even receive alerts when new threats are uncovered.

Your steady progress of knowledge building will better prepare your organization for the cybersecurity challenges of the current environment, as well as those that will emerge in the future. A fact sheet from the National Cybersecurity and Communication Integration Center, providing some useful information on their functions and activities, is included below.

Any concerns you may have about the potential vulnerabilities of instruments or equipment currently in place should be shared with vendors as part of the evaluation of your current systems.


Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Developing a Useful Alarm Strategy for Industrial Process Control

pharmaceutical sanitary process tanks batch operation
Pharmaceutical process operation
Industrial process control operators and designers have the capability to measure many aspects of machine operation and process performance. Determining the elements to measure, method of measurement, and how to handle and process the derived information can be challenging, but can also impact the security, performance, and safety of an operation. A plan for monitoring, reporting, and responding to abnormal process conditions, if properly developed and executed, can yield real benefits to a process operator. A protocol that is not well conceived may produce a negative operational impact by creating events that unnecessarily draw resources away from productive endeavor. That protocol, or plan, is often referred to as an alarm plan.

There are numerous forces that can influence the development and implementation of an alarm plan. Each operation must incorporate its own set of external regulatory requirements, internal procedures and policies into a complete alarm protocol. Distilling that macro description down to a workable set of procedures and response tasks is where the real work begins. There is, however, a basic framework that can help organize your thinking and focus on what is most important.

  • What parameters define the process or operation?
    Produce a schedule of every non-human element that is required to make the process function. This will require drilling down through every machine and material that is part of the operation. Expect the schedule to be extensive, even huge. If it is not, consider that your analysis may not be reaching deep enough. The goal here is to create an overview of what makes the process work and provide a tool for systematically studying the process elements and gleaning possible commonalities or relationships among them. Consider disregarding things that cannot be measured, since that prevents the derivation of data for evaluation. Review the completed schedule and decide which parameters shall be measured and evaluated for proper performance.
  • What level of measurement is needed for each monitored parameter?
    An assessment of the needed accuracy, frequency, and resolution for parameter measurement will help define the requirements for instrumentation or other devices used to monitor a particular item. The goal is to make sure the monitoring device is capable of detecting and delivering information of sufficient quality to make decisions.
  • Define the limits of acceptability for each monitored parameter.
    Until the endpoint of the process or operation, each step is likely dependent in some way on previous steps. The output of each step becomes the input of the next. While this, in many cases, may be an oversimplification, it is important to consider the relationships between the
     tasks and operations that comprise the process. Monitored parameters should relate to the successful completion of a process step, though not necessarily be a direct indicator of success. The maintenance of the parameter within certain bounds may be used as an indicator that a component of successful completion was properly attained. Defining limits of acceptability may involve an element of subjectivity and will likely be customized to accommodate the process. Each organization shall evaluate their operation and determine limits based upon intimate process knowledge and experience.
  • Define abnormal operation for each monitored parameter.
    Abnormal operation may not necessarily be any value not within what is considered acceptable. Consider abnormal to be the range of values that would be cause for notification of the operator, or even automated or human intervention. Note that the definition of unacceptable or abnormal operation might appropriately include filters or defined relationships with other parameters. An example of a simple filter is a time delay. If the measured variable exceeds the specified limit for 2 seconds, it make not be significant. If the threshold is exceeded for 2 minutes, it may be cause to take action. As with the limits of acceptability, developing the definition of abnormal operation for each parameter will be customized for each process.
  • Provide a defined response for every alarm occurrence.
    If it is important to monitor something, then it is likely important to do something when things get out of hand. Human executed alarm response should be concise and uncomplicated, to reduce the probability of error. Automated response should be designed in a manner that provides for functional testing on a regular basis. The scope of the response will be specific for each process, with the level of response depending upon factors determined by the process operators. Response can be as simple as annunciating the condition at a monitoring station, or as dire as shutting down part or all of the process operation.
  • Review every alarm occurrence
    Each alarm event should be logged and reviewed. Consider whether the event detection and response was adequate and beneficial. If the results were less than expected or desired, assess whether changes can be made to provide improved results in the future. The alarm plan is unlikely to be perfect in its first incarnation. Be prepared to reevaluate and make changes to improve performance.
The exercise of developing a comprehensive alarm plan will help to build understanding of process operation for all involved parties. This article is but a brief synopsis of the subject, intended to get the reader on the path of developing a useful alarm plan. Your alarm plan should an extension of process operation decision making, and have a goal of enhancing safety and reducing loss.   

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Hardening Industrial Control Systems Against Cyberattack

Multiple industrial pumps
All industrial control systems and processes should
be evaluated for their vulnerability to cyberattack
Industrial control system owners, operators, and other stakeholders should be aware of their exposure to malicious intrusion and attack by individuals or organizations intent on inflicting physical damage, stealing information, or generally wreaking havoc throughout an industrial operation. The risk of intrusion, regardless of the size or type of facility, is real.

The National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center, part of the US Department of Homeland Security, ...
serves as a central location where a diverse set of partners involved in cybersecurity and communications protection coordinate and synchronize their efforts. NCCIC's partners include other government agencies, the private sector, and international entities. Working closely with its partners, NCCIC analyzes cybersecurity and communications information, shares timely and actionable information, and coordinates response, mitigation and recovery efforts. (from www.us-cert.gov/nccic)
The NCCIC has published a set of seven basic steps toward establishing a more secure industrial control system. I have included the publication below, and it is interesting and useful reading for all involved in industrial process control.

Having a fence around an industrial site, with a guarded entry gate, no longer provides the level of security needed for any industrial operation. Read the seven steps. Take other actions to build your knowledge and understanding of the risks and vulnerabilities. Cybersecurity is now another layer of design tenets and procedures that must be added to every control system. It will be a part of your company's best practices and success, now and in the future.

There are uncountable legacy controllers and communications devices throughout industrial America. All need to be reassessed for their vulnerability in the current and upcoming security environment. When reviewing your processes and equipment, do not hesitate to contact Mountain States Engineering for assistance in your evaluation of our products.


Monday, February 8, 2016

A Framework For Thinking About Process Instrument Protection

industrial process steam piping and gauges
Provide adequate levels of protection for instruments
and controls that keep your process running
The performance of every process is critical to something or someone. Keeping a process operating within specification requires measurement, and it requires some element of control. The devices we use to measure process variables, while necessary and critical in their own right, are also a possible source of failure for the process itself. Lose the output of your process instrumentation and you can incur substantial consequences ranging from minor to near catastrophic.

Just as your PLC or other master control system emulates decision patterns regarding the process, the measurement instrumentation functions as the sensory input array to that decision making device. Careful consideration when designing the instrumentation layout, as well as reviewing these five common sense recommendations will help you avoid instrument and process downtime.

Process generated extremes can make your device fail.

Search and plan for potential vibration, shock, temperature, pressure, or other excursions from the normal operating range that might result from normal or unexpected operation of the process equipment. Develop knowledge about what the possible process conditions might be, given the capabilities of the installed process machinery. Consult with instrument vendors about protective devices that can be installed to provide additional layers of protection for valuable instruments. Often, the protective devices are simple and relatively inexpensive.

Don't forget about the weather.

Certainly, if you have any part of the process installed outdoors, you need to be familiar with the range of possible weather conditions. Weather data is available for almost anywhere in the world, certainly in the developed world. Find out what the most extreme conditions have been at the installation site....ever. Planning and designing for improbable conditions, even adding a little headroom, can keep your process up when others may be down.

Keep in mind, also, that outdoor conditions can impact indoor conditions in buildings without climate control systems that maintain a steady state. This can be especially important when considering moisture content of the indoor air and potential for condensate to accumulate on instrument housings and electrical components. Extreme conditions of condensing atmospheric moisture can produce dripping water.

Know the security exposure of your devices.

With the prevalence of networked devices, consideration of who might commit acts of malice against the process or its stakeholders, and how they might go about it, should be an element of all project designs. A real or virtual intruder's ability to impact process operation through its measuring devices should be well understood. With that understanding, barriers can be put in place to detect or prevent any occurrences.

Physical contact hazards

Strike a balance between convenience and safety for measurement instrumentation. Access for calibration, maintenance, or observation are needed, but avoiding placement of devices in areas of human traffic can deliver good returns by reducing the probability of damage to the instruments. Everybody is trained, everybody is careful, but uncontrolled carts, dropped tools and boxes, and a host of other unexpected mishaps do happen from time to time, with the power to inject disorder into your world. Consider guards and physical barriers as additional layers of insurance.

Know moisture.

Electronics must be protected from harmful effects of moisture. Where there is air, there is usually moisture. Certain conditions related to weather or process operation may result in moisture laden air that can enter device enclosures. Guarding against the formation of condensate on electronics, and providing for the automatic discharge of any accumulated liquid is essential to avoiding failure. Many instrument enclosures are provided with a means to discharge moisture. Make sure installation instructions are followed and alterations are not made that inadvertently disable these functions.

Developing a thoughtful installation plan, along with reasonable maintenance, will result in an industrial process that is hardened against a long list of potential malfunctions. Discuss your application concerns with your instrument sales engineer. Their exposure to many different installations and applications, combined with your knowledge of the process and local conditions, will produce a positive outcome.



Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Mountain States Engineering and Crane Expand Their Relationship

Triple Offset Butterfly Valve
Krombach Triple Offset Metal Seated Valve
Courtesy Crane CPE


Mountain States Engineering and Controls has been selected as the new distributor of the Krombach branded valves from Crane CPE. MSEC has been a master distributor for various brands in the Crane family for fifteen years, and will be capitalizing on knowledge and experience gained from their many years of providing solutions in the industrial process control and valve fields. The Krombach branded valves complement the applications range of other industrial valves handled by MSEC.

The Krombach line includes:
  • Butterfly Valves - High performance, resilient seated, double-eccentric, triple offset and special purpose butterfly valves.
  • Ball Valves - Process one-piece, two-piece and three-piece, metal seated, soft seated and compact ball valves.
  • Globe and Angle Valves - Bronze, cast iron, cast steel and stainless steel globe and angle valves.
  • Gate Valves - Bronze, cast iron, cast steel and stainless steel gate valves.
  • Check Valves - Ball, dual-plate, foot, full body swing, steam stop, tilting disc, wafer style swing, nozzle-type and pressure seal check valves.
  • Vacuum Relief Valves - Available with flanged or threaded connections.
  • Aerating and Deaerating Valves - Essential for trouble-free operation of pipeline systems handling liquids.
  • Float Valves - Single seated and double seated versions for a variety of applications.
  • Throttle Valves - Available with flange connection, wafer- or weld-in type.
  • Bottom Drain Valves - Available manually operated or with a diaphragm actuator.
I have included below one of the many comprehensive data sheets available. More information on any application or product is available from the process control specialists at MSEC. Combining their product knowledge with your process mastery is the key to positive outcomes.

Thursday, August 6, 2015

Industrial Steam Coils and Unit Heaters - Specify For Longevity

Industrial Steam Coil
Industrial Steam Coils
courtesy of Industrial Mechanical Specialties, Ltd.
There are many applications for steam coils and unit heaters in the industrial  and processing fields. Lacking the sizzle of high technology, steam coils are simple, straight forward pieces of gear that are intended to transfer heat from steam to air. While simple in principle, their importance in process or application is notable. You are heating that air because it needs to be heated in order for something else to continue working properly. Steam coil thermal performance is predictable and well understood, making sizing of the coil tube and fin components a relatively simple task. A critical and practical element for steam coil selection is specifying attributes that will deliver ruggedness and longevity to reduce the probability of failure due to normal wear and tear associated with the process and installation environment.

Employing heavier gauge fins and tube walls can provide a longer service life. Cabinets or casings fabricated of corrosion resistant materials, such as stainless steel, may also lengthen the service life of the unit. Any motors, mountings, fan guards, or other hardware should also be evaluated for upgrading to enhance service life.

Industrial Unit Heaters With Motor
Industrial Steam Unit Heaters
Courtesy Industrial Mechanical
Specialties, Ltd.
Of course, there is always cost involved. Examining the true cost of downtime to repair or replace a steam coil will likely show that some carefully considered options are well worth the comparatively small additional cost. Consult with a coil specialist. Discuss your application and see what construction enhancements will deliver longer on-line performance for your process.




Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Reduce Process Downtime With Device Protection

The list of possible events or conditions that can crash your process is immense. Fortunately, most of the possible occurrences are tagged with extremely low probabilities that allow us to sleep at night without worrying about impending disaster. However, we are engineers and industrial process operators. We are supposed to make sure everything keeps flowing smoothly. Here is a small part of your world that can be made more secure with some practical consideration.

Oil and Gas Industry Installation
Oil and Gas Industry Installation
Industrial processes require two very basic elements, measurement and control. The instruments used to measure process variables and the control devices employed to change them must be kept in operation, in many cases, all the time. You invest time to research available products, searching for the right materials of construction, signal output, accuracy, and a whole range of other attributes that will make your selection perfectly suited to the process requirements. This technical selection process is an essential part of the process design and implementation. What other aspects of your measurement and control hardware may play an important part in maintaining process uptime?

Give some consideration to the conditions or events that might take a particular instrument or control device out of action. With the application of imagination and good judgement, combined with some help from an experienced application engineer, you can develop additional items to incorporate into the design and installation of your process measurement and control elements. Here are some basics to get you started.

What is the security exposure for your device?

Not considered so much in the past, thinking about how someone without the best interests of your organization in mind might create havoc should be part of your general assessment of each installation. Fully understanding the access pathways, physical or otherwise, to your instruments and controls is necessary to thwart unauthorized tinkering or malicious mischief.

What are the real extremes of weather conditions occurring at the device’s physical location?

Data on the weather for every industrialized country, and some that are not so industrialized, is freely available. Check it out. Forget about the average range of conditions. Look for conditions that occur once in a hundred years or more. A small hardening of your installation might provide the needed capacity or strength to withstand the worst weather in a hundred years. Challenge your device vendors with these weather conditions. It might leave your process the only one standing after that freak storm.

What extreme conditions may be generated by the process that could lead to device damage or deterioration?

The normal process conditions are generally known. Consider, though, the instantaneous or short duration occurrences that, while associated with normal operation, may have an adverse impact on installed measurement and control devices. What happens when elements start or stop, open or close? Are there malfunctions of one device that could snowball into a string of failures of other devices?

process measurement instruments
Process Measurement Instruments
What are the physical contact hazards where the device is installed?

Measurement and control equipment needs to be provided with personnel access for maintenance, repair, even real-time observation in some cases. Along with human access comes the wide array of misbehaviors of which we are all capable. There is not one of us that has not tripped and fallen, dropped something, or bumped into something with undesirable results. Plan for contact with people and the things they may carry around your plant or installation. Locate sensitive gear away from major traffic areas and provide protection from unplanned contact with people, dollies, carts, tools, boxes and anything else that may pass through the area.

Are your devices and equipment protected from moisture?

Electronics are an integral part of modern industrial measurement and control equipment. Electronic devices will be damaged or destroyed by exposure to excessive levels of moisture. Moisture exists everywhere in our environment, primarily as vapor or liquid. The ability of moisture to find its way into unprotected enclosures is well known, and you should take precautions to prevent its entry and accumulation in your devices.
Protecting your installed process measurement and control equipment is an investment that pays dividends in process uptime and reduced repair effort and cost. It is challenging to think of all possible hazards, so consult an experienced engineering sales team and tap into their field experience to make your project as good as it can be.


Monday, June 22, 2015

Selecting the Right Valve Type - Gate Valves

There are many types of valves available for industrial fluid handling and process control applications. Specifying the proper valve type for an application can be made easier with some basic knowledge about the application strengths and weaknesses of the various valve types.

gate valve cutaway view
Gate Valve Cutaway View
Courtesy DHV Industries
Gate valves open and close by changing the position of a rectangular or round wedge (the gate) in the fluid flow path. The sealing surfaces are arranged in a planar fashion and the gate, which is commonly either flat or wedge shaped, slides along the sealing surface from the open to closed position. Because of the cross-sectional shape of pipes, which is often mimicked in the valve body, the size of the opening created as the gate valve opens and closes does not change at the same rate as the percentage of total available movement of the gate. This non-linear aspect of valve operation can make a gate valve less suitable for an application where flow rate must be accurately controlled across the range from fully open to fully closed. Complicating throttling operations further is the possibility of the gate vibrating when partially open, due to the fluid flow around the gate assembly. Unless specifically designed for throttling, gate valves are generally best suited for applications requiring either full flow or no flow. Because of its operating nature and construction, a gate valve may prove to be the appropriate selection, based upon the type of media or fluid which is being controlled.

In addition to specifying the manner in which the valve will be connected within the piping system, consideration should be given to construction of the valve body. If it may be necessary to inspect, service, or clean the valve interior, look for a bonnet connection that will permit suitable access to the valve interior.

Once you have decided that a gate valve will be the most suitable type for your application, there are many other considerations in valve selection. Draw on the experience and knowledge of coworkers, maintenance technicians, and valve sales engineers to help specify a valve assembly that meets the needs of all project stakeholders.

Monday, May 18, 2015

And Now for A Little Shameless Self Promotion ...

A little shameless self promotion to spread the word of what lines Mountain States Engineering and Controls carries should anyone out there need assistance.


MSEC, Inc. is a Manufacturer's Representative & Distributor of process equipment and controls headquartered in Lakewood, Colorado since 1978.

We serve the markets of Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, Montana, Utah, Nevada, Idaho, and the western Dakotas.

Monday, September 22, 2014

Metal Body, Industrial Diaphragm Valves

A quick video showing the basic operation of a metal body, diaphragm valve for industrial applications.

The video illustrates how the metallic lower valve body is machined for a smooth controlled flow characteristic, and how the elastomer diaphragm is controlled by the liner movement of the valve stem. Full open, full closed, or proportional flow is controlled by the relationship of the valve diaphragm and valve body.

Metal body diaphragm valves are available in many metal alloys such as brass, cast steel, and 316 stainless steel, with many different elastomers including EPDM, PTFE and Viton.

These valves are great for inert and corrosive liquid and gaseous media, are highly resistant to chemicals, are insensitive to particulate media and offer a compact  design (ideal when space is at a premium).


Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Cooling Tower Terms and Definitions

Delta Cooling Tower
Delta Cooling Tower
(definitions courtesy of Delta)
Cooling Tower Terms and Definitions

BTU (British Thermal Unit) A BTU is the heat energy required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit in the range from 32° F to 212° F

Cooling Range The difference in temperature between the hot water entering the tower and the cold water leaving the tower is the cooling range.

Approach The difference between the temperature of the cold water leaving the tower and the wet- bulb temperature of the air is known as the approach. Establishment of the approach fixes the operating temperature of the tower and is a most important parameter in determining both tower size and cost.

Drift The water entrained in the air flow and discharged to the atmosphere. Drift loss does not include water lost by evaporation. Proper tower design can minimize drift loss.

Heat Load The amount of heat to be removed from the circulating water within the tower. Heat load is equal to water circulation rate (gpm) times the cooling range times 500 and is expressed in BTU/hr. Heat load is also an important parameter in determining tower size and cost.

Ton An evaporative cooling ton is 15,000 BTU’s per hour.

Wet-Bulb Temperature The lowest temperature that water theoretically can reach by evaporation. Wet-Bulb temperature is an extremely important parameter in tower selection and design and should be measured by a psychrometer

Pumping Head The pressure required to pump the water from the tower basin, through the entire system and return to the top of the tower.

Makeup The amount of water required to replace normal losses caused by bleed off, drift, and evaporation.

Bleed Off The circulating water in the tower which is discharged to waste to help keep the dissolved solids concentration of the water below a maximum allowable limit. As a result of evaporation, dissolved solids concentration will continually increase unless reduced by bleed off.

Monday, August 18, 2014

Introduction to Electric Valve Actuators

electric actuator
Crane 44000 Series Electric Actuator
In many industrial control applications, a motorized valve can be used in place of a pneumatically operated valve. Motorized valves use electricity and an electric motor to operate a valve. The spindle of the valve is connected to the motorized (electric) actuator via linkages (brackets and couplings) or are directly mounted to the shaft of the valve. Valves most commonly operated by electric actuators are globe, gate ball or butterfly valves.

Electric actuators are widely used in control systems because they are easy to interface with control systems. Since the control signals are also electric, the same conduit or conduit paths can be used. Electricity is normally available and can be run over long distances, unlike fluid power (pneumatic) which requires pumps and compressors. Special construction and wiring options must be considered when working in hazardous location though.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Basics of Flow Meters

flow meter
Flow Meter

Measuring the flow rate of solids, liquids, and gases is referred to as flow measurement, and is a very important and widely used control variable. Many industries such as power, chemical, water, waste-water treatment, energy, mining and petroleum have many requirements for flow measurement and control.

A flow meter is a device that measures the rate of flow or quantity of a moving fluid in an open or closed conduit. There are two basic ways of measuring flow: volumetric basis and weight basis.

Flow measuring devices are generally classified into four groups:
  1. Mechanical type flow meters: Fixed restriction, variable head type flow meters using different sensors such as orifice plates, venturi tubes, flow nozzles, pitot tubes, quantity meters such as positive displacement meters, mass flow meters, etc. 
  2. Inferential type flow meters: Variable area flow meters (Rotameters), turbine flow meters, target flow meters, etc.
  3. Electrical type flow meters:  Electromagnetic flow meters, Ultrasonic flow meters, laser doppler anemometers etc.
  4. Other flow meters: Purge flow regulators, flow meters for solids flow measurement, cross-correlation flow meter, vortex shedding flow meters, flow switches, etc.
Flowmeters need to be integrated into existing piping or new installation. There are two methods for flowmeter installation: inline and insertion. With the inline method, connectors are provided for upstream and downstream pipes. For the insertion method, a sensor probe is inserted into the pipe.

Most flowmeters are installed with straight sections of pipe on either side for flow to normalize. For the inline method, the diameter of pipes should be same as the flowmeter size. Insertion design is easier to install and more economical in large diameter pipes.

To select the suitable flowmeters many factors should be taken in mind. The most important is fluid phase (solid, liquid, gas, steam) and the other is flow condition (clean, dirty, viscous, open channel etc.). The next important factor is line size and flow rate. Other properties that will affect the selection of flowmeter are density, pressure, temperature, viscosity etc. You should consult an application engineer before specifying a flow meter to assure proper installation, lowest installed cost and safety.


Saturday, May 31, 2014

Always Looking for Ways to Add Value and Help Customers Solve Industrial Process Control Challenges

We opened our doors in 1978 with the mission of creating the most technically competent and application savvy industrial process control rep in the Mountain States. Headquartered in Lakewood, Colorado, MSEC established itself as a premier Manufacturer's Representative and Distributor of process equipment, industrial controls, engineered valves, heat exchangers and cooling towers. Serving the markets of Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Utah, Nevada, Southern Idaho, Western Dakotas and the Panhandle of Nebraska, we earned a reputation for outstanding customer service. Now, with the reach and convenience of the Internet, we'll use this blog as another way to provide value to our customers - both existing and prospective.

We plan on sharing years of experience and knowledge here. Steam management experiences, process control application case histories, new industrial control products, automated valve packages and interesting jobs we've done. We hope this will be a place where information can be exchanged. If you like what you see, please tell others in your industry about us.