Showing posts with label pump. Show all posts
Showing posts with label pump. Show all posts

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Regenerative Turbine Pumps

regenerative turbine pump for industrial use
Regenerative Turbine Pump
Roth Pump
Most of us are familiar with centrifugal pumps and their generally understandable operating design. A regenerative turbine pump is significantly different in the way in which liquid moves through the impeller section, enabling this pump type to prove advantageous in a number of industrial applications.

A centrifugal impeller basically traps some liquid at the inlet and rapidly slings through the discharge port. The liquid velocity is increased by the impeller and manifests as outlet pressure. The key distinction here is that the liquid enters and exits the impeller only one time. A regenerative turbine pump has an impeller with a comparatively larger number of vanes, also of a different shape. This shape imparts a circulatory movement of the liquid from the vanes to the casing, and back to the vanes. Each return to the vane section increases fluid velocity, which can be converted to increased pressure. As the impeller rotates, liquid enters, leaves, then re-enters the vane section many times. This process is called regeneration. The impact of this design is a pump that can deliver substantially greater pressure than a centrifugal pump with the same impeller diameter and rotational speed.

A regenerative turbine pump is capable of pumping fluids with up to forty percent entrained gases without damage from cavitation or any performance loss. Fluid conditions with even low levels of entrained gases would likely produce substantial loss of performance in a centrifugal pump, evidenced as fluctuating discharge pressure and excessive wear and vibration. Where cavitation is a concern, the regenerative turbine pump holds the advantage over centrifugal. Applications with low flow and high head requirements will also be better serviced by a regenerative turbine pump.

There is more to be learned. Some additional detail and explanation are provided in the document included below. Effective solutions are developed through a combining of your process knowledge and the application expertise of a product specialist. Reach out and share your fluid transfer challenges for the best solution.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Economical Suction Diffuser Provides Industrial Pump Protection

Suction Diffuser for Industrial Pump
Courtesy Titan Flow Control, Inc.
Liquid handling in industrial processes commonly involves the provision of a pump to move the fluid in the desired manner. Industrial pumps operate best and longest when they are provided with inlet conditions within a range for which the pump is designed. Two conditions prevalent among many pumps are low levels of particulate matter greater than a tolerable size and minimized turbulence at the pump inlet. Piping and specialties approaching the pump inlet should be arranged to provide these conditions to promote low vibration, energy savings, and a long service life.

An effective way to provide pump protection, save installation space, and reduce the probable demands for maintenance and service over the machine's expected operating life is to specify and install a suction diffuser at the pump inlet. There are numerous advantages to this approach.
  • The unit is mounted directly to the inlet side of the pump, saving space and additional connection points.
  • An integral strainer prevents unwanted materials from entering the pump inlet.
  • Straightening vanes on the outlet side of the suction diffuser reduce turbulence in the flow entering the pump.
  • Provision of a suction diffuser reduces the total parts count and connection points (joints) approaching the pump inlet. A single cast unit takes the place of a strainer, reducing elbow, and entrance pipe. Reduced installation time and cost are achieved using the integral design of the suction diffuser.
Titan suction diffuser installation
Suction Diffuser shown installed on pump inlet.
Courtesy Titan Flow Control, Inc.
A suction diffuser may not be the most exciting specialty you ever install, but the benefits of its use warrant your attention. It's one of those simple product ideas that contributes to a good pump installation you can confidently sign off on. You can find out more by reaching out to a product expert and discussing your potential application.


Monday, April 27, 2015

Differences Between a Regenerative Turbine Pump and a Centrifugal Pump

Regenerative turbine pump have double row vanes cut in the rim. The impeller rotates within two liners into which annular channels have been milled. Liquid flows in at the suction and is picked up by the impeller vanes. In completing nearly one revolution in the annular channel, the fluid develops a high velocity and pressure increases dramatically before being sent out the discharge. The liquid re-circulates between the impeller vanes and the annular chamber. Because of this action, the fluid flows in a path like a helical spring laid into each of the annular grooves as the fluid is carried forward. Energy is added to the fluid by a number of vortex impulses in the impeller vanes, as it travels from suction to discharge.

These impulses have the same effect as multi- staging in a centrifugal pump. In a multistage centrifugal pump, the pressure is the result of energy added in each stage. In a turbine pump, pressure is added to the fluid stream by circulating many times through the vanes of a single impeller.



One of the most remarkable features of the regenerative turbine pump is its performance characteristics when pumping highly volatile liquids. The manner in which the turbine impeller imparts velocity/energy to the fluid, as described above, is quite different from conventional centrifugal or positive displacement designs. The continuous, progressive building of pressure in a regenerative turbine pump essentially eliminates the sudden collapse of bubbles that is destructive cavitation.

turbine pump can develop about ten times the discharge pressure of a centrifugal type having equal impeller diameter and speed. Pressure increases nearly uniformly around the impeller rim. At the impeller hub, the pressure is about one half the discharge pressure. This lower pressure, plus suction pressure, is what is seen in the stuffing box. Holes through the impeller keep the impeller centered to reduce wear, prevent unbalanced pressures on the impeller and reduce end thrust on the bearings.

REGENERATIVE PUMP DESIGN ADVANTAGES
  • Develop higher pressures
  • Can be run at lower motor speeds
  • Eliminate cavitation
  • Operate with lower NPSHr
  • Deliver specified capacity with input pressure variations
  • Meet performance with fewer stages
  • Smaller size
For more information on regenerative turbine pumps, contact:

Mountain States Engineering and Controls
1520 Iris Street
Lakewood, CO 80215
303.232.4100 Phone
303.232.4900 Fax
Email: info@mnteng.com

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Cavitation in a Water Pump and Valve - Excellent Visual and Audible Demo...

Cavitation is the formation of gas bubbles in a flowing liquid when the pressure of the liquid drops below its vapor pressure. Sometimes a difficult concept to grasp, this video offers an excellent demonstration on what actually happens inside process piping, pumps and valves during this phenomena.